19
Dec
21

Updated PAN Truncation FAQ

As part of the holiday giving tradition, the PCI SSC has given us an updated FAQ (#1091) on the subject of PAN truncation and it will likely go down as the most confusing FAQ ever.

The FAQ starts out simple enough with the statement:

“A maximum of the first 6 and last 4 digits of the PAN is the starting baseline for entities to retain after truncation, considering the business needs and purposes for which the PAN is used.”

But it is the table that follows that gets messy.

It seems that each of the card brands has their own take on PAN truncation based on PAN length and other factors. Only American Express has stayed the course.

Based on the guidance for UnionPay, Visa, Mastercard, JCB and Discover, the idea of first six/eight and ANY OTHER four is a bit bizarre not to mention risky.

Never mind the obvious warning note at the end of the FAQ that states:

“Access to different truncation formats of the same PAN greatly increases the ability to reconstruct full PAN, and the security value provided by an individual truncated PAN is significantly reduced. If the same PAN is truncated using more than one truncation format (for example, different truncation formats are used on different systems), additional controls should be in place to ensure that the truncated versions cannot be correlated to reconstruct additional digits of the original PAN.”

Personally, I would stick with the good old first six, last four and avoid any of these other formats as you are likely setting yourself up for problems and PCI non-compliance.

Happy holidays to all!

Advertisement

2 Responses to “Updated PAN Truncation FAQ”


  1. 1 Zulfiqar
    January 14, 2022 at 11:22 AM

    Dear PCI Guru,
    are MC and Visa cards in the scope of the new truncation (first 8 and any 4) rule?

    Thanks
    Zulfiqar


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


Welcome to the PCI Guru blog. The PCI Guru reserves the right to censor comments as they see fit. Sales people beware! This is not a place to push your goods and services.

December 2021
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  


%d bloggers like this: