Archive for the 'Requirement 1 – Install and maintain a firewall' Category

23
Jul
19

Requirement 1.2.3 And Not Applicable

I had a question posed here a week ago that resulting in a discussion regarding whether or not PCI DSS requirement 1.2.3 can be marked as ‘Not Applicable’ or NA.  What prompted this discussion is a post from long ago where I discussed certain requirements that cannot be marked as NA.

The discussion revolved around this statement from page 4 of the PCI Report On Compliance (ROC) Reporting Template in a discussion about the difference between Not Applicable and Not Tested.

“Using the example of wireless and an organization that does not use wireless technology in any capacity, an assessor could select “N/A” for Requirements 1.2.3, 2.1.1, and 4.1.1, after the assessor confirms that there are no wireless technologies used in their CDE or that connect to their CDE via assessor testing. Once this has been confirmed, the organization may select “N/A” for those specific requirements, and the accompanying reporting must reflect the testing performed to confirm the not applicable status.”

I can tell you right now that the Council’s Assessor Quality Management (AQM) team has called out the fact that when they say “does not use wireless technology in any capacity” they mean absolutely NONE, NADA, ZIP.  I cannot tell you the number of discussions I and others have had in AQM reviews where they mark you down for missing this nuance.  At the end of the day, their rule is that the minute a QSA sees wireless whether it is corporate wireless, guest wireless, whatever, that means that 1.2.3 must NOT be marked NA.

In discussions with a variety of QSAs, we all remarked that we regularly see sections 3.7 and 3.8 mention wireless networks as well as it is documented in the network diagrams in section 4.1.  Yet, when you got down to 1.2.3 the QSA would mark it NA because the wireless did not connect to the CDE.  In today’s ultra-connected world, it is extremely rare (as in almost never) that wireless is NOT present and operated by any organization.  Even data centers have wireless installed in their facilities.

Even if that wireless is not in the CDE, the QSA is required to validate that the wireless has no direct access to the CDE.  That is exactly why 1.2.3.b specifically asks:

“Verify that the firewalls deny or, if traffic is necessary for business purposes, permit only authorized traffic between the wireless environment and the cardholder data environment.”

The QSA must reply either ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to 1.2.3.b.  There is no NA option here.

If the answer to 1.2.3.b is ‘No’ (which is usually the case), the QSA is required to:

Describe how firewall and/or router configurations verified that firewalls deny all traffic from any wireless environment into the cardholder environment.”

The bottom line is – if there is ANY mention of wireless networking anywhere other than the requirements in 11.1, then 1.2.3 must NOT be marked as NA.

Hopefully we are all clear on how to address wireless networks now.

08
Jul
18

Can I Use SSAE 18 SOC 2 Reports? Part 2

In the last post I discussed what the SOC reports are and what, in general, to look for in a SOC 2/3 report.  Now I want to take you through the more detailed analysis of the SOC reporting so that you can understand why it might not give you the result you desire and how to address that fact.

How Do I Analyze The SOC Report?

Based on the testing in the ‘Information Provided by Independent Service Auditor’ section, you are going to need to map that testing into the PCI ROC tests, if they even fit.  I typically use the Prioritized Approach spreadsheet to do this as it provides a way of documenting the requirements covered and a quick dashboard regarding what is covered.

As you reviewed the domains listed under the SOC 3 report, I am sure you thought; “What is not to like?  It looks like most of what I need for PCI is covered.”  But you would be wrong.  You will find after you map the controls from any SOC 2 report that covers all the TSP domains into the Prioritized Approach that the report will likely only cover around 20% to 25% of the PCI DSS requirements.  That is because the level of detail in the SOC tests are just not as detailed as they are in the PCI DSS.  As a result, SOC 2 reporting does not provide the kind of reliance you need to respond to all of the relevant PCI DSS requirements.

For example, while SOC will likely test that password controls are in place, you will be unable to ascertain if the organization enforces seven character or greater password lengths, password complexity, nor if they require passwords to be changed every 90 days or less.  Let alone if the special requirements for vendor password management are enforced.  It is these missing details that create the coverage problems with using the SOC reporting results.

The same can be said for change management.  When tested, the SOC report will likely call out a lot about change management, but not at the level of detail required in the PCI DSS for requirements under 6.4.  You will also find that coverage in requirements 1 and 2 regarding network and server configurations will be lacking in specificity to meet the PCI DSS testing.

Now as a QSA, you have a decision to make.  Can you accept only 20% to 25% of coverage of PCI DSS requirements as being PCI compliant?  I know I cannot.  I need much more to work with before I can get comfortable that a SOC report provides the necessary coverage for PCI compliance.

Now What?

You and your client have expended all this effort and are no closer to the result desired than when this process started.

So, what to do next?

Work with your service providers that provide you SOC reports to include testing that adds the PCI DSS details that are missing.  There will likely be a bit of push back from these service providers because adding testing to their SOC reports will cause the cost of their SOC reports to increase, sometimes significantly.  So be prepared for it.

What you need to do is to have their auditors add the necessary testing details to the description of controls and then have them test that they are in place.  Examples include:

  • Password length, complexity, change frequency and the procedures followed to perform a password reset.
  • Details surrounding privileged and general user management including provisioning, management approvals, users are implemented with least privilege and users are disabled or removed when terminated.
  • Changes tested for segregation of duties between developers and operations, segregation of test, QA and production environments, production data not used for testing, developers do not have unrestricted access to production, test data and accounts removed before applications are promoted to production, changes document impact, they are appropriately authorized, they have been tested, they have been vulnerability assessed and they document backout procedures.
  • If encryption is used to protect data, document the algorithms used, are key custodian agreements in place, are split key processes in place if performing manual key management, indicate if a hardware security module (HSM) is used and are keys changed when their crypto-periods expire or they are believed to be compromised.
  • Document the configuration standards that are followed by device classes such as firewalls, switches, servers and test that they have been implemented.
  • Document that anti-virus is implemented on systems commonly affected by viruses and malware, what the anti-virus solution is that is implemented, the anti-virus solution cannot be disabled and that the anti-virus solution is actively running on all systems it is installed.
  • Document that vulnerability scanning is performed, how often scanning is performed and that vulnerabilities are remediated.
  • Document that penetration testing is performed, how often penetration testing is performed and that findings are remediated.
  • Document that log data is collected from all devices, it is reviewed at least daily and that it contains a date/time stamp, device name, type of log entry and other relevant information.

There are a lot of other areas that could be added to the SOC report, but these are, in my opinion, the bare minimum that need to be added to make the SOC report more relevant for PCI.  I am trying to balance the amount of additional information needed versus the cost of providing it in the SOC report.

By adding all of this will it cover all of the gaps between SOC and PCI?  No.  But it should give your QSA significantly more comfort that the controls in place to meet PCI than what is currently being provided by CPAs.

04
Jul
18

Can I Use SSAE 18 SOC 2 Reports? Part 1

This is a common question that QSAs encounter from clients.  The client has an SSAE 18 Controls at a Service Organization (SOC) report from one of their service providers and they want to know if they can use it to satisfy any or all of the requirements in 12.8, 12.9 and 12.11 related to vendor management?

The biggest caveat in this discussion is that the PCI SSC does not sanction the use of any report other than a PCI Attestation Of Compliance (AOC) and/or a PCI Report On Compliance (ROC) in addition to any other PCI reports.  The Council has repeatedly stated that if a QSA chooses to rely on an SSAE 18 SOC 2 report (or any other compliance report for that matter), the QSAC and their client accepts the risk if the SSAE 18 SOC 2 does not cover what the QSA claims it covers and therefore relies upon it for fulfilling PCI ROC requirements.  As a result, most QSAs will not accept an SSAE 18 SOC 2 report (or any other non-PCI compliance reports) for any reason.

For those of us “recovering” certified public accountant (CPA) types that have conducted SSAE18 audits, we know how to read and interpret these reports.  As a result, when we are asked about SSAE 18 SOC 2 reports being relevant, our answer is that, “It depends on what the SOC 2 covers and how it was tested.”

Before we get too deep into this discussion though, we need to define the terminology surrounding this topic.  The first thing is that SSAE 18 replaced SSAE 16 as of 2017 even though nothing else appears to have changed.  The next key thing anyone needs to know about SSAE 18 is that there are three reports that can come from this reporting series: SOC 1, SOC 2 and SOC 3.

The first, SOC 1, is for financial auditors only.  It used to be called a SAS 70 years ago.  It is a report focused on financial controls that an external auditor needs to ensure that the financial numbers coming from the third party can be relied upon in their annual audit of their client.  Yes, these SOC 1 reports can cover security controls, but that is only in regard to financial systems, not necessarily the third party’s entire environment.  In addition, the control coverage is typically not as deep as required for PCI compliance.  The bottom line is that any reliance on a SOC 1 report outside of financial systems should never be assumed.

I am going to cover the SOC 3 report next because it covers all of the security domains.  The SOC 3 report (also sometimes referred to as the ‘SysTrust’ report) covers the following domains:

  • Organization and Management – The criteria relevant to how the organization is structured and the processes the organization has implemented to manage and support people within its operating units.
  • Communications – The criteria relevant to how the organization communicates its policies, processes, procedures, commitments, and requirements to authorized users and other parties of the system and the obligations of those parties and users to the effective operation of the system.
  • Risk Management and Design and Implementation of Controls – The criteria relevant to how the entity (i) identifies potential risks that would affect the entity’s ability to achieve its objectives, (ii) analyzes those risks, (iii) develops responses to those risks including the design and implementation of controls and other risk mitigating actions, and (iv) conducts ongoing monitoring of risks and the risk management process.
  • Monitoring of Controls – The criteria relevant to how the entity monitors the system, including the suitability, and design and operating effectiveness of the controls, and takes action to address deficiencies identified.
  • Logical and Physical Access Controls – The criteria relevant to how the organization restricts logical and physical access to the system, provides and removes that access, and prevents unauthorized access to meet the criteria for the principle(s) addressed in the engagement.
  • System Operations – The criteria relevant to how the organization manages the execution of system procedures and detects and mitigates processing deviations, including logical and physical security deviations, to meet the objective(s) of the principle(s) addressed in the engagement.
  • Change Management – The criteria relevant to how the organization identifies the need for changes to the system, makes the changes following a controlled change management process, and prevents unauthorized changes from being made to meet the criteria for the principle(s) addressed in the engagement.

There are also some additional considerations that are related to Confidentiality specified in the Trust Services Principals and Criteria (TSP), but those are not required to be covered in the SOC 3 report.

Finally, there is the SOC 2 report.  The SOC 2 report uses the same TSP as the SOC 3 but with a twist.  The third party can select any or all of the seven domains to be assessed.  Think of it as a “cafeteria style” assessment.  With the SOC 2, the AICPA does not require that all domains be covered (as with the SOC 3), the assessed entity can select only those domains they wish audited.  As a result, a third party could select only the ‘Organization and Management’ domain to be assessed and nothing else in their SOC 2 report.  Therefore, just because you have a SOC 2 does not mean it covers the domains necessary for your PCI assessment.  Like the SOC 3, in addition to the seven domains, the SOC 2 can also cover none, any or all of the additional considerations documented in the TSP.

Within each of these SOC reports there is a Type I and a Type II report.  A Type I report is basically worthless from a reliance perspective because no testing of the controls is ever performed.  With a Type I report, the auditor is signing off on the fact that the third party has controls defined and formally documented.  But without testing, there really is no point to this report.  Yet every now and then, I encounter a Type I report that an organization has relied upon for years.

The only report worth anything is a Type II report which tests the control environment to ensure that the controls are functioning as designed.  So, when you get that SOC 2 report, you need to make sure you have a Type II report where testing has been performed by the auditor.  Even then though, the report might not be as useful as you might think.

I Have A SOC 2 Type II Report From A Service Provider

While you want to read the whole report in detail, when I am pressed for time and cannot read it in its entirety, here is where I focus so that I can get a quick view of what I have.  Some CPA firms provide a one-page Executive Summary that gives the reader a quick overview of the report, provides the timeframe the report covers, opinion, exceptions and other useful information.  But that is not required by the AICPA so you cannot always rely on such an overview being in every report you receive.  When they are available, they can help you focus your quick review efforts even better.

The first thing to do is to read the auditor’s opinion which should be the first section of the report.  It is in the form of a letter on the auditor’s letterhead and signed by the auditing firm.  The opinion the auditor provides will be either:

  • Unqualified – no material control weaknesses or failures were identified.
  • Qualified – some material control weaknesses or failures were identified.
  • Adverse – significant control weaknesses or failures were identified.

An unqualified opinion is what all organizations desire and what most reports document.  But do not be fooled by an unqualified opinion.  There still could have been control weaknesses or failures identified but they did not rise to the level of being considered “material”.  I have seen some unqualified reports with control weaknesses that I would have considered material as their auditor, so you might still want to contact the organization to get clarification on any weaknesses identified.

A report with a qualified opinion is not the end of the world, but that will all depend upon what control weaknesses or failures created the qualification.  Someone misusing their access can be minor compared to not performing backups of servers for months.  As a result, you need to read each control weakness to determine the criticality of the control failure as well as review management’s responses to how they addressed or will address the failure.  Again, you may find yourself contacting the organization to clarify weaknesses documented.

In my experience, reports with an adverse opinion never get issued to the public.  Management sees all of the control failures and weaknesses and then embarks on the long arduous task of cleaning up their control environment.

The next section to look at is the one labeled ‘Information Provided by Independent Service Auditor’ or similar.  This is the section that will contain the testing results and will define which of the domains were covered as well as the timeframe the report covers.  Most organizations issue SOC reports annually, so you always want to make sure that you have the most current report.  If the coverage end date is getting within three months of a year old or more, you should contact the third party and ask them when the next report will be issued.  They should inform you that the new report is in progress and give you an estimated date the report will be issued.  If they do not give you a succinct answer, I would be concerned.

You need to go through this section looking at a couple of things.  The first is to determine which of the domains were covered.  While documenting those domains, you also need to review the testing that was performed and at what level of detail those tests were conducted.  For example, it is not unusual to see tests for change control cover five random changes but not test those changes for having appropriate documentation, backout instructions and testing, only that the changes were approved.  At some point you will need to read this section carefully to determine what, if anything, will cover the testing required by the PCI DSS.  But a quick perusal will usually give you an idea of what you are likely going to get out of the SOC 2 for PCI compliance, if you are going to get anything at all.

This leads to the next section of the report you should read.  The last section of all SOC reports is usually titled ‘Supplemental Information Provided By [Organization Name]’.  This section contains information that was provided by the entity being audited but is not covered by the auditor’s opinion.  There can be all sorts of information presented here but the important point to remember is that the auditor did not test or assess the accuracy of that information.  So, you need to take any information provided in this section with a bit of skepticism.

It is in the Supplemental Information section that you want to look for a sub-section titled ‘Management’s Response to Control Exceptions’ or similar.  Even when an organization has an unqualified opinion, there can still be items listed in this section.  If there are items listed, you want to carefully read what those items were and how management addressed or corrected the condition.  If you find any control issues and responses that concern you, you should contact the entity and get those discussed so that you are comfortable with the situation.  If you cannot get comfortable with the situation, then you may want to consider additional controls at your end to compensate for the control weakness with the third party.

In the next postpost I will take you through a more thorough review of the SOC report.

17
Mar
18

Can Every Requirement Be Met With A Compensating Control?

“In theory, theory works.” – Jeff Hall

Some years back, the PCI SSC came out at the Community Meeting and stated that every PCI DSS requirement could be addressed by a compensating control worksheet (CCW).  A rather broad statement but it started a bunch of us in the PCI community thinking, “Is that really the case?”

Before reading this post, I highly recommend reading my post on writing CCWs so that you can fully appreciate why not every requirement can be met by a CCW.

That said, it turns out that there are a lot of requirements where there is no way to develop a CCW.  Here are just a few examples.

1.1.2 – Network Diagram(s) and 1.1.3 – Data Flow Diagram(s)

What would be the mitigating controls here?  There are none because diagrams are diagrams.  There is nothing you can do to compensate for these missing other than provide them.

1.1.6 – Firewall Rules

As with 1.1.2 and 1.1.3, what could possibly serve as a mitigating control?  If the firewall rules are not able to be reviewed, there is nothing you can rely upon to go above and beyond the control.

I have had people suggest that the QSA could rely on Nmap and vulnerability scans of the firewalls.  But that does not necessarily confirm all of the ports/services that are configured for the firewall nor does it necessarily confirm that the devices using those ports are the same ones that are in scope for PCI compliance.

1.2.3 – Wireless Networking

QSAs have repeatedly been told that this requirement can never be marked as ‘Not Applicable’.  The QSA is required to respond to how they confirmed at wireless was either in or out of scope.  But can you create a CCW for these requirements?

The controls that you need to assess to meet these requirements are the same controls you have to use in the CCW for mitigation.  So, if you have to document and evaluate the controls regardless, why would you bother to write a CCW?  You would not.  You would document and meet the requirements and move on.

3.2 – No Storage of SAD

This is the requirement that started the whole CCW debate.  When the PCI DSS was originally issued, QSAs were trained that this requirement could NEVER, EVER have a compensating control.  But that changed when the Council issued their proclamation a few years back.  But is that really the case?

Remember, a CCW must go above and beyond the intent of the original requirement.  3.2 also states in a note that SAD cannot be stored even if encrypted.  Encryption would be the only mitigating control available to an organization that wants to store SAD.  So what replaces encryption if that cannot be used?  Tokenization by a third party would be an option, but if you go that route, you are not storing the SAD, so the discussion becomes moot.

8.3 – Multifactor Authentication

Some form of multifactor authentication (MFA) is required for non-console administrative access to cardholder data environment (CDE) systems and remote access to an in-scope network.  Since the Council has clearly defined MFA and also knocked down multiple logons with different credentials, what is left?  In the end, there is no way around meeting this requirement other than doing what the requirement states.

10.1 – 10.3 and 10.6 – Log Data

Here is another example of where there really is no way to write a CCW.  You are either gathering log data (centrally or on individual systems) or you are not.  You are either reviewing the log data daily or you are not.  Then there is the requirement of sending log data from internet facing devices to an internal device.  No matter how creative you think you are, there are no controls that will mitigate this situation and also go above and beyond.

As I said at the beginning of this post, these are just some of the examples where a CCW is just not going to make it.  So, the next time you think about meeting a PCI DSS requirement by using a CCW, make sure you understand the requirement and that there are controls that will mitigate the risk and go above and beyond the original intent of the requirement.  You will save yourself and your QSA a lot of time and consternation.

18
Aug
17

Why Voice Over IP Matters

“Voice over IP are the most insidious set of communication protocols ever invented by man.” – Jeff Hall

I have been having some interesting conversations of late with prospects and clients regarding Voice over IP (VoIP).  These conversations all seem to revolve around whether or not VoIP is in scope for PCI compliance.  Ultimately the conversation turns to a discussion of why I believe VoIP is in scope for PCI and almost every other QSA seems to never bring the subject up.

The primary reason I believe VoIP is in scope is that the PCI SSC says so.  If you read FAQ #1153 titled ‘Is VoIP in scope for PCI DSS?’ the Council makes it painfully clear that VoIP is definitely in scope if VoIP transmits sensitive authentication (SAD) or cardholder data (CHD).  If you doubt it, here is the exact quote from the first paragraph of that FAQ.

“While PCI DSS does not explicitly reference the use of VoIP, VoIP traffic that contains cardholder data is in scope for applicable PCI DSS controls, in the same way that other IP network traffic containing cardholder data would be.”

Yet even when it is stated that clearly, I still run into people that claim I am making a mountain out of a mole hill and their VoIP is not a risk because other QSAs have never inquired about it.  What that merely means is that other QSAs are ignoring it when they should not be ignoring it.

The first problem with VoIP seems to be that very few people understand it which is the biggest reason in my opinion that a lot of QSAs avoid the discussion.  But it is not just QSAs.  I speak with network administrators, information security personnel and other technology people all of the time and if there is one topic that will glaze over all of their eyes, it is VoIP.  When the discussion turns to VoIP, people seem to hark back to that old PBX system tucked away in the basement or closet.  No one seems to remember that the PBX did get updates (usually two or three a year).  All anyone remembers is that it just worked and that it got replaced once, maybe twice, in a generation.  And the biggest risk was toll fraud from the Caribbean.

But scarier yet is that these people do not seem to completely understand how VoIP and its protocols work let alone the risks.  The biggest problem with VoIP are the protocols used and the reason for my quote at the start of this post.  Regardless of whether you are talking SIP, H.323, H.248, whatever, they all operate the same.  Call set up (start of a call) and call tear down (end of a call) are the only points of a VoIP telephone conversation that are stateful, i.e., conducted via TCP.  The actual call itself is all done via streaming UDP just like any other audio/video stream.  Adding insult to injury, VoIP also requires a large number of the ephemeral UDP ports above 32767 to be open.  UDP, being what it is, provides one of the best transport mechanisms for delivering malware.  There are hundreds of exploits for VoIP from the most benign DDoS attack to turning a VoIP telephone into a spying device by surreptitiously enabling its microphone and video camera (if it has a camera).  But my personal favorites are the attacks that use the VoIP network as an entry point into an organization’s data network.  The bottom line is that the only way to firewall any of the VoIP protocols for actual protection is to keep them away from the rest of your network.

But it can and does get worse.  Add in VoIP trunks from your telephone carrier and you really begin to have a recipe for disaster.  When you have VoIP trunks from your carrier, your internal VoIP network is really only protected from every other VoIP network by the carrier and your call managers.  It is that sad fact that keeps a lot of information security professionals up at night.  If security is all about your weakest link, how do you protect yourself and minimize your risk when your weakest link is essentially the entire world’s phone systems?

Let us add insult to injury in this tale of woe and bring in the concept of unified communications and its primary tool, the softphone.  A softphone is software that turns a PC into a telephone using VoIP. All users need is the internet and a VPN connection to the office network and they have their office telephone right there no matter where they are in the world.  However, the softphone opens up that PC to the same risks that exist for every other phone using that call manager.  But if your VoIP system is used to take calls that discuss cardholder data (CHD), you have now turned that PC with a smartphone into a Category 1, in-scope device because it is now connected to a Category 1, in-scope system and network.  Suddenly all of that effort to achieve PCI scope reduction flies right out of the window.

But this all gets the more fascinating as people go back to their VoIP vendors and find out even more troubling issues with their VoIP solutions.  I remember numerous conversations where people thought once a call was connected to a phone that a call manager was no longer involved therefore the call managers could be put on a different network segment, only to find out that call managers act as bridges when calls are conferenced, involve telepresence or they are to/from outside lines.  They also find out that with the advent of unified communications, services such as instant messaging and email integration are no longer separate servers/functions from the call manager and cannot be easily segmented from the call managers to take them out of scope.

But then there is the revised draft version of the VoIP information supplement from the PCI SSC.  Great guidance if you have a call center.  Worthless for any other sort of implementation of VoIP.  It treats VoIP as a discrete operation as though only the call center model exists for VoIP implementations.  Granted call centers are the largest risk when they are in scope because their call volume is typically 80%+ of calls involving payments.  But all sorts of organizations take payment information over the phone but are not a call center model.

So, what about the organization that has call centers and also normal business people all on the same system?  Based on the information supplement, every phone is a Category 1 device unless the call center VoIP system is separate from the rest of the organization.

Must the call center be on a separate VoIP system from the other users?  It would appear to be that way to manage scope.  But again, there is no explicit guidance for any other implementation model other than a call center.

And if the other users take overflow calls from the call center or occasional calls dealing with PAN, how would separate systems help with that situation?  Near as I can tell, it does not help.

And what about unified communication solutions?  No idea as the information supplement does not reference a unified communication solutions.  However, given the whole premise of unified communications is that it is tightly integrated in most VoIP solutions, other communication methods such as instant messaging and telepresence would likely be in scope as well for PCI compliance.

The bottom line is that the advice I provided over six years ago in this blog is still accurate today.

16
Apr
16

PCI DSS v3.2 Draft Released

On Friday, April 15, 2016 while a lot of you were probably getting your US income taxes done, the PCI SSC decided to release the draft of v3.2 of the PCI DSS.  I know the announcement message to me from the Council ended up in my company’s spam filter, so you may want to check there if you did not receive a message.  I was lucky enough for a colleague to forward his copy along to me.  However to get the draft, you need access to the PCI Portal to obtain the draft PCI DSS v3.2 and the requisite change log.

These are some of the more notable changes in the new PCI DSS version.

  • The draft provides an official sunset date for v3.1 of the PCI DSS. Regardless of the date in April that v3.2 is released, v3.1 will be withdrawn on October 31, 2016.  So any assessments done after that date will need to comply with and use v3.2.
  • Two new sections to Appendix A have been added. In addition to the Appendix for shared hosting providers (now marked A.1), we get Appendices A.2 and A.3.  2 covers SSL and early TLS for those of you that will miss the June 30, 2016 date.  For those of you that thought 2018 was the deadline and missed discussions on the Webinar about the SSL/early TLS deadline, while the deadline was extended to June 30, 2018, any organizations missing the June 30, 2016 date must fill out Appendix A.2.  A.3 is where the Council added the designated entities supplemental validation (DESV) requirements.
  • There are a number of new requirements for service providers that are best practices until February 1, 2018. Those new requirements include: (1) maintain a documented description of the cryptographic architecture, (2) detect and report on failures of critical security control systems, (3) perform penetration testing on segmentation controls at least every six months, (4) executive management to establish responsibilities for the protection of cardholder data and a PCI DSS compliance program, and (5) perform reviews at least quarterly, to confirm personnel are following security policies and operational procedures.  I would bet that numbers three and five will likely create a lot of contention with service providers.  But you have until February 1, 2018 to get those in place.  However, if experience teaches us anything, service providers had better start now getting these new requirements in place and operating.
  • All organizations picked up the following new requirements that are best practices until February 1, 2018: (1) change control processes to include verification of PCI DSS requirements impacted by a change, and (2) multi-factor authentication for all personnel with non-console administrative access to the CDE. As with the aforementioned new requirements for service providers, these will also require a lot of organizations to get started now to ensure these new requirements are in place and operating.
  • The Council clarified requirement 8.1.5 to show that it is intended for all third parties with remote access, rather than only vendors. While most organizations understood the intent of this requirement, there were a few that played “legal eagle” and refused to require compliance for non-vendors.
  • Requirement 6.5 has been clarified that developers must go through secure coding training at least annually. This change will likely create some consternation for some organizations that are developing their own software that is in-scope for PCI compliance.
  • Clarified 11.5.a by removing “within the cardholder data environment” from the testing procedure for consistency with requirement, as the requirement may apply to critical systems located outside the designated CDE. This will likely expand the number of systems that require critical file monitoring.
  • Clarified 12.8 1 by saying that the list of service providers now must include a description of the service(s) provided.
  • Clarified 12.8.2 by adding guidance that service provider responsibility will depend on the particular service(s) being provided and the agreement between the two parties.
  • One of my pet peeves has finally been addressed. I have always had an issue with requirement 1.1.6 and the use of the terminology “insecure protocols”.  The reason is that in one way or another, all protocols have their insecurities whether they are known or not.  In v3.2, the Council has finally removed the “insecure” designation as, in their words, “these may change in accordance with industry standards.”  It is those small battles at times that make your day.

There are other clarifications and edits that have been made to the new version.

For all of us QSAs, we await the Reporting Template which will detail out the actual testing to be performed which will allow us to assess the real impact to the effort required to conduct an assessment.  As a result, there could still be some surprises with this new version of the PCI DSS.  So stay tuned.

21
Jul
15

An Update On Network and Dataflow Diagrams

A number of years ago, I wrote a post on how to diagram for your QSA. While my original post still has validity, there have been a few changes have occurred so I thought it was a good time to update everyone so that diagrams meet what your QSA needs for documentation.

One of the changes that came with v3 of the PCI DSS was with requirement 1.1.3 that now explicitly calls out that the data flow diagram be overlaid on the network diagram. The purpose of this was twofold. First, such an approach allows the organization being assessed to further refine their scope for their PCI assessment. Second, it allows the QSA an easier time to confirm that the scope of the PCI assessment is accurate.

Prior to v3, organizations had a tendency to deliver data flow diagrams that had no basis in reality as to how they were physically implemented. A lot of this was due to the fact that developers and networking types never communicated between one another. As a result, QSAs would hear comments such as, “All I know is it just works”, “You’ll have to ask the developers …” or “You’ll have to ask the networking people …”. This obviously resulted in a lot of discussions (i.e., arguments) over scope accuracy between QSAs and their clients. Under the new v3 requirements, hopefully all of those discussions will go a lot easier and faster.

Regardless of what requirement 1.1.3 states, QSAs are still encountering data flow diagrams that look more like cubist or surrealist paintings. This situation seems to be driven by the fact that a lot of organizations either do not want to or cannot get their developers and networking folks together to come up with a data flow diagram that can marry up to the network diagram. Let me tell you that going through this exercise greatly reduces the issues surrounding scope because scope becomes very clear once everyone can “see” how data flows through the network. However, it is not surprising when organizations come back and say they found the exercise too daunting. Lots of organizations operate in such a siloed structure, that: (1) it takes an act of God to get everyone necessary together for such a discussion, (2) everyone agrees on the flows and networks used and (3) somewhere there is a flow that no one knows about or knows how it works. All of this can be resolved, but it takes time and information to work out and can end up being incredibly tedious particularly in a complex environment.

Unfortunately, while the scope becomes much clearer once the dataflow is overlaid on the network, the scope also tends to end up much larger than anyone realized. That is because systems that were thought to not have any connectivity (Category 3) to the cardholder data environment (CDE) end up as connected systems that could impact or influence the security of the CDE (some form of Category 2). It is then that there is a “mad dash” to minimize the number of these systems that need connectivity, i.e., reduce scope. It is during these scope reduction efforts that we encounter twisted and contorted arguments regarding systems that are clearly in-scope, but the client does not want to be in-scope and will do anything and everything imaginable to remove them from scope. Some of these discussion become so tortured in their logic as to be laughable, e.g., “Can’t we just ignore them?” and my personal favorite, “If I paint these servers “blue” will they then be out of scope?”.

But to further confirm scope, v3 introduces us to a revised requirement 11.3 that went into effect on July 1, 2015. As part of that change, the penetration test methodology now requires that the penetration testing exercise prove that network segmentation is in place as documented and therefore further prove that the scope for PCI compliance is accurate. This basically requires the penetration tester to confirm that your network diagram overlaid with the dataflow in fact fully documents your organization’s scope for PCI compliance. Therefore, if your dataflow and network diagrams are junk, do not be surprised if your penetration tester and/or QSA come back and tell you that your scope is larger than you thought.

Behind the scenes, there has been a change made by the PCI SSC through their reviews of QSAs’ ROCs under their quality assurance program. The Council is concerned that the diagrams put in ROCs are not always legible to readers. While organizations provide the original diagrams, the Council wants diagrams in reports to be legible for the banks and processors when they review the reports. As a result, QSAs and ISAs have been informed that their ROCs need to break out or section large diagrams so that they are legible on standard paper (i.e., 8.5”x11” or A4). As a result, a lot of ROCs are exponentially increasing in size to accommodate the network and data flow diagrams that now require many additional pages to ensure that the diagrams are legible in the ROC.

This should bring us all back up to date on network and dataflow diagrams.

01
Jan
15

The Three Hop Rule

At the 2014 Community Meeting, the PCI SSC responded to a question about network segmentation with what has come to be termed the “Three Hop Rule”.  The statement was made that if a device/system was “three hops or more” away from the cardholder data environment (CDE), then it was out of scope.  A lot of us in the room were taken aback by this statement.  And based on some questions of late regarding this subject, there is a lot of confusion out there regarding what the Council was trying to say.

First, the term “hop” is not a network security term nor does it even have any security implications.  The term “hop” is defined as:

“Data packets pass through routers and gateways on the way.  Each time packets are passed to the next device, a hop occurs.”

The count of three therefore is the number of hops or “hop count” between devices.  Hop count is defined as:

“Each router along the data path constitutes a hop, as the data is moved from one Layer 3 network to another.  Hop count is therefore a basic measurement of distance in a network.”

Nowhere in these definitions is there any statement about hops, the number of hops between devices and any correlation of hops and hop count as some form of security.  Hence why a lot of us were really concerned about this statement and likely why there is so much confusion and discussion resulting from the comment.

What we believe the Council was getting at was the number of network segments there are between a device/system and the CDE.  However, having three network layers between the CDE and devices/systems is also no guarantee of security.

What provides security at Layer 3 are the access control lists (ACL) or rules that allow or deny packets to traverse particular paths of the network.  ACLs can be implemented to control what devices and/or ports and services can communicate between various networks.  But just because there are ACLs implemented at each hop is also no guarantee that the number of hops between devices also secure the devices.

This is why the requirements in requirement 1 of the PCI DSS require that the QSA review all relevant ACLs to ensure that the network is truly segmented.  It is also why in v3, requirement 11.3 requires that the penetration testing also prove that the network is truly segmented.  As a result, the number of hops between the CDE and a device should not be considered a guarantee and never will be a guarantee that a device is out of scope.

The bottom line is that, in order to be truly out of scope, there needs to be ZERO hops between a device and the CDE.

26
Apr
14

Why SAQ A-EP Makes Sense

A colleague of mine attended the PCI SSC QSA Update session at the ETA convention a couple of weeks back.  One of the big discussion items was how the Council is being pilloried over SAQ A-EP.  This SAQ was developed to address the recommendations that were documented in the information supplement titled ‘PCI DSS E-commerce Guidelines’ that was published in January 2013.  Specifically, SAQ A-EP addresses the ecommerce sites that do redirects to a processor’s site that does the actual payment processing.

Based on the comments I have seen online and made in personal conversations, you would think that SAQ A-EP was heresy or a bad joke.  All of these derogatory comments are being driven by merchants that were sold a bill of goods by slick, non-PCI informed, sales people pushing redirected ecommerce solutions by claiming that it put the merchant entirely out of scope.  This was not the case and never was the case, particularly after the issuance of the information supplement.  However, we still encounter outsourcing vendors that continue to claim a redirect approach puts the merchant entirely out of scope.

To understand the rationale of SAQ A-EP we need to understand the risk surrounding these redirect solutions.  The risk is that an attacker modifies the redirect on the merchant’s server to now point to their own payment page, collects the customer’s cardholder data (CHD) on the attacker’s page and then, optionally, passes the customer on to the original payment page at the processor so the customer and merchant are none the wiser.

Under the PCI DSS and card brands’ security programs, redirect systems are still in-scope for PCI compliance because they are a key control in the payment process even though the merchant’s server issuing the redirect does not come into direct contact with CHD.

With all of that said, SAQ A-EP is not a full SAQ D, but it is not as short and simple as SAQ A either.  There are a lot of requirements to be met with SAQ A-EP which is why merchants are up in arms.  However, if you understand the aforementioned risk, you should understand why the requirements that have to be complied with in SAQ A-EP are there.

The requirement 1 requirements are all there to ensure that there is a firewall protecting the server that does the redirect.  This is Security 101 and I would doubt that any merchant would not have a firewall protecting all of their Internet facing servers.  Routers have always been optional and if the merchant does not have control of those devices, then they would not be included here.

Requirement 2 is all about making sure that all devices in the cardholder data environment (CDE) are properly configured and security hardened.  Again, this is Security 101 stuff.  If a merchant is not doing this for Internet facing devices, they are just begging to be attacked and compromised.

The requirements called out in SAQ A-EP for requirement 3 are there to confirm that the merchant is not storing cardholder data (CHD) or sensitive authentication data (SAD).  A merchant using a redirect should be marking these as Not Applicable (NA) and documenting that they do not store CHD in their system(s) because they use a redirect that processes and transmits CHD directly between their processor and their customer.  Any merchant that answers these requirements any other way should not be using SAQ A-EP.  All of that said, merchants need to have proof that they examined logs, trace files, history files, databases, etc. and did not find any CHD or SAD in those files.

Requirement 4 is provided to ensure that secure communications are used.  I would recommend documenting the SSL/TLS certificate information for your processor for the requirements in 4.1.  But do not pass over requirement 4.2.  A lot of ecommerce only merchants have call centers or take telephone calls and do order entry into the same Web site used by their customers.  As a result, merchants need to make sure that email, instant messaging, etc. are never used for communicating CHD/SAD.

Requirement 10 is important for any forensic research should the redirect be manipulated so that it can be determined when that event occurred so that the scope of any compromise can be determined.

While one would think that the vulnerability scanning and penetration testing requirements in requirement 11 would be thought of Security 101 and self-explanatory, you would be surprised at how many merchants argue about that fact.  Again, the driver of these redirect solutions was cost reduction and vulnerability scanning and penetration testing incur costs, sometimes significant costs depending on the number of servers, firewalls, load balancers, switches, etc. involved.  If you do not do vulnerability scanning and penetration testing as required, how do you know that the redirect system(s) are properly secured and patched?

However, the key requirement that cannot be missed is requirement 11.5 regarding critical file monitoring.  That is because the whole security of the redirect environment is pinned on detecting any modification of the redirect URL.  All of the other requirements in SAQ A-EP are there to minimize the risk of compromising the redirect.  11.5 is there to ensure that, if the other controls fail, at least the merchant would be alerted to the fact that the redirect had been changed.  If a modification to the redirect cannot be reliably detected by the critical file monitoring solution, then the security of the redirect cannot be assured.

The remaining requirements for 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 12 are all Security 101 items.  If you are not following these requirements as part of best practices for security and IT operations in general, then you need to consider what exactly you are doing.

Hopefully everyone now understands SAQ A-EP and why it is not as simple as that slick sales person implied.

07
Dec
13

POS Botnets

Just in time for the holidays.

An article came out this past week regarding botnets that are specifically targeting point of sale (POS) systems.  The reason I bring this up is because of this quote.

“StarDust developers have intimate knowledge of the inner workings of PoS applications such as Clearview PoS.  As a result, the malware can ferret out where in computer memory sensitive data, in some cases in cleartext form, is stored.  StarDust can also sniff network traffic and is able to extract Track1 and Track2 card data.  To remain covert, the software transfers card details only when the terminal is inactive and the screensaver is on. It also uses the RC4 cipher to encrypt data before sending it to the control server.”

Obviously, if your organization uses Clearview POS software you should probably be examining your systems and networks to ensure that they have not been compromised by StarDust.

However, the larger issue is that most merchants do not see themselves as targets of such attacks, let alone have they constructed a secure environment for their POS systems.  Some of this is not entirely the merchant’s fault.  A lot of merchants outsource the maintenance and management of their POS systems to a value added reseller (VAR) and that VAR is the one responsible for the POS network configuration.  Regardless of responsibility, a merchant needs to be aware of these threats and take appropriate action either internally or with their VAR to address these threats and minimize risk.

Regardless of whether it is StarDust or a similar threat, here are some steps you can take to minimize and detect such threats.

  • Segment your POS network from the rest of your internal network and limit POS network segment traffic to only communication to your processor and internal network and system support and operations systems.  This will require the development of network access rules so that traffic can only reach your processor or internal system support and operations systems.  This will limit the number of systems that could compromise your POS environment.
  • Monitor your POS network segment for any traffic that is directed to an external network other than your processor or system support and operations systems.  Your firewall rules should only allow secure connections between your POS network and your processor or your system support and operations systems.  Network traffic going anywhere else should be stopped and reported for further investigation.
  • Monitor your POS systems for any file or configuration changes.  Most anti-virus solutions can provide this capability, but there are also solutions that are specifically engineered for this task.  Regardless of which you choose, configure the tool to alert you as soon as it identifies a potential change to files or configuration of the POS system.  If approved changes were not made to the POS systems and you received an alert, you likely have been compromised.
  • Develop an incident response plan should you receive an alert indicating that your POS systems have been compromised.  An incident response plan provides the organization with a “battle plan” should a compromise occur.  This type of plan is key to minimize the potential reputational impact to the organization should such an attack be confirmed.  A good incident response plan can keep you from making mistakes as you navigate the mine field that is the media circus that comes with a breach.

Three straight forward and simple steps that can minimize the threat of StarDust and a documented incident response process should you unfortunately be breached.

Security does not have to be rocket science.




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