Archive for the 'Requirement 12 – Maintain a policy that addresses information security' Category



08
Aug
15

The Third Party Dilemma

I am starting to see more and more of this situation with my mid-size and larger clients, the third party that is using the client’s network to process and transmit cardholder data (CHD).

Where I consistently encounter this are at internal cafeterias where a third party operates the cafeteria and is providing their own point of sale (POS) solution to process card transactions. Another example where this is common are mailrooms that are operated by third parties and employees can buy stamps and ship personal packages with the third party taking cards for payment. Finally, another place where this is common is health care facilities, particularly hospitals, where the cafeteria is operated by a third party, the gift shop is operated by another third party, the pharmacy is operated by a third party and so on. As we go forward, I would expect that this situation will become more and more commonplace as organizations outsource more and more back office functions to third parties and focus on their core business.

A lot of these third parties have ended up on clients’ networks. They may or may not have been segmented away from the rest of the client’s network, but they typically sit behind the clients’ firewalls and other security measures. With the focus on requirements 12.8 and 12.9 regarding the management of third parties, these outsourcing environments are receiving new scrutiny as clients begin reassessing how these third parties are provided network and Internet access as well as PCI compliance, contract and other regulatory and legal issues.

So what are your options if you are involved in such arrangements? Here are some thoughts.

  • Ignore the problem and hope it goes away. Yes, believe it or not there are a lot of organizations that have found out that their organization is chock full of such situations and have just tossed up their hands and have decided to put off addressing the issue. Unfortunately, if the organization is required to perform a PCI assessment, this is not an option and they end up having to address it as part of their own assessment. Unfortunately, the problem does not go away because the third parties ask for an AOC of the organization for the network services they are providing.
  • Wide Area Ethernet. In this scenario, your organization becomes a telecommunications carrier providing Internet access to any third party over a separate WAN. This requires Ethernet WAN or Metro Ethernet equipment that support WAN grade service versus LAN grade service. Third parties are provided access to the Internet but must provide their own infrastructure such as firewalls and switches. The bottom line is that your organization becomes no different than any other carrier such as Verizon or AT&T and will be out of scope.
  • Wide Area Wi-Fi. Similar to Wide Area Ethernet using the same WAN infrastructure equipment but using Wi-Fi (802.11a/b/g/n/ac) to deliver network access. While this avoids installation of wiring infrastructure, it means a separate secured Wi-Fi network from your existing Wi-Fi. In addition, depending on how it is engineered, it could suffer from device overload if all of your third parties are in the same general area of your facility. But as with Wide Area Ethernet, your organization is considered a carrier and out of scope.
  • Another wireless alternative is putting your third parties on cellular connections. Where this can be problematic is in facilities that have poor cellular connectivity. In these situations, the organization may have installed cellular repeaters for carriers throughout the facility to improve cellular signals. However, not all of the facility may have repeater coverage where the third parties are located so there could be additional costs involved to get the coverage needed. Like Wi-Fi, cellular repeaters have limitations on the total number of connected devices, so areas where employees and the third parties congregate such as cafeterias could have issues with cellular access at breakfast, lunch and dinner times. This can be mitigated, but could create service issues for all users at heavy usage times.
  • P2PE or E2EE. Use of either of these solutions depends on your third party’s ability to use such a solution with their POS. With these solutions, you can create a separate VLAN for your third parties and they can all attached their points of interaction (POI, aka card terminals) to that VLAN and the traffic will be encrypted out to their respective processors. Where this solution does not work is when the third party uses a POS solution that does not support P2PE/E2EE. In addition, if all your third parties do not support P2PE/E2EE you may have to have a second solution for them. So it may be simpler to use one of the other solutions for consistency.
  • Physically Separate Third Party Network. This is a feasible option if you want to avoid the Wide Area equipment costs and requirements. However, the equipment used must be physically separate from your existing LAN equipment so as to qualify as being considered a carrier versus a service provider. As with the Wide Area solutions, you will not be providing firewalls or any other security services, just access to the Internet. Any security measures on this network would be the responsibility of each third party.
  • Separate Third Party VLAN. This is the option I typically encounter in most organizations. The organization’s network has a VLAN separate from its other networks but still relying on the organization’s infrastructure. The problem here is that this is not a carrier network because it is not physically separate from the internal network. Yes, there are ACLs in place that isolate the VLAN from others, but the infrastructure is shared and could come into scope if changes cause that to happen. This can still be acceptable if all third party traffic is encrypted such as with a VPN or P2PE/E2EE. But where this solution gets into trouble is when the organization providing the VLAN is also doing the encryption on behalf of the third parties. In the end, a VLAN solution will have to be assessed as a service provider because the organization is providing network access as a service not as a carrier.
  • Contract with their own carriers. This is an option, but potentially a rather messy option. That is because your third parties will need to contract with their own carrier which could create a wiring nightmare in your facilities. Particularly when new third parties come in or change carriers. There are ways to manage this but it requires planning and working with your third parties to make this effort successful.

These approaches all have their pluses and minuses, but hopefully you now have some ideas as to how to handle this issue.

Advertisement
11
Jul
15

Get Over It, You Are A Service Provider

I get a lot of inquiries asking about these sorts of situations and thought I should clear this up before too many organizations get hurt. The scenario goes something like this.

“I outsource my eCommerce site to a third party. The third party’s Web site does a redirect to [pick your processor]. I asked the third party for their Attestation Of Compliance (AOC) and they are telling me they do not need to be PCI compliant because they are out of scope. This is because their servers do not process, store or transmit cardholder data (CHD).”

From the PCI DSS Glossary v3.1, the PCI SSC defines a ‘Service Provider’ as:

“Business entity that is not a payment brand, directly involved in the processing, storage, or transmission of cardholder data on behalf of another entity. This also includes companies that provide services that control or could impact the security of cardholder data. Examples include managed service providers that provide managed firewalls, IDS and other services as well as hosting providers and other entities. If an entity provides a service that involves only the provision of public network access—such as a telecommunications company providing just the communication link—the entity would not be considered a service provider for that service (although they may be considered a service provider for other services).”

So here we go again – organizations splitting legal hairs, this time on the meaning of “directly involved.” The discussion from the service providers seems to revolve around the fact that issuing a redirect to the actual payment processor puts them out of scope because they are not “directly involved.”

I hate to rain on your parade, but it is my job.

First, as an outsourcer, you are a service provider to your customers. You can split legal hairs all you want on the first part of the definition, but your organization definitely meets the second part of the definition that this “also includes companies that provide services that control or could impact the security of cardholder data.”

Oh, that is right, you do not believe that your service could “control or impact the security of cardholder data.” Really? Your Web site that issues the redirect does not “control” the security of cardholder data or your site that issues the redirect could not impact the security of cardholder data if that redirect is changed. Who is liable for those problems? Your merchant customers? Think again and think about how that will play out in the media.

Second. To add insult to injury, a lot of you service providers point to SAQ A to support your argument. Seriously? SAQ A at least requires your organization to comply with certain requirements in sections 9 and 12 which means your organization is in scope for PCI compliance. Talk about twisted logic. But you are a service provider, so you cannot use SAQ A because only SAQ D or a Report On Compliance (ROC) can be used by service providers.

But if the first two points do not convince you, let us talk about how the card brands and payment processors dole out responsibility and liability if a problem occurs. Do you really believe that you have no skin in this game? As the outsourcer, you have all the skin in the game. If any redirect is tampered with, it’s not your merchant customers that will be on the hook. Yes, they will likely be the first one’s taken to the woodshed, but when the truth comes out that it was all your organization’s fault, your customers and their processors will come after your organization. It was not the merchants that created the problem, it was your organization. Your organization will be the one held liable for the problem, not your merchant customers.

The bottom line here is that you are a service provider and you are in-scope for PCI compliance. Get over it. You go right ahead and try to get around PCI compliance with your warped logic. When it hits the fan, it will be your organization that will be held liable, not your customers.

For all you merchants that are using these sorts of service providers, you need to either: [1] badger them to give you an AOC, [2] assess them as part of your own PCI assessment, or [3] find a new service provider that can provide an AOC. The choice is yours.

14
Mar
15

The 2015 Verizon PCI Report

A lot has been written about this year’s Verizon PCI Compliance Report particularly about how 80% of organizations cannot maintain their compliance. And at the very end of the report are a number of issues raised by Verizon regarding why maintaining compliance is so difficult for most organizations. It is those issues that I would like to discuss.

Scale and Complexity of Requirements

“I just don’t understand why this ERP upgrade is going to take 18 months to complete. Can’t we just put the DVD in the drive and upgrade it like Microsoft Office?” – Anonymous Executive to IT Management

The same could be said about any security framework. If organizations are struggling with PCI compliance, imagine how they are struggling with HIPAA, FISMA or ISO 27K compliance. Compliance with any of the security frameworks is not easy.

I disagree with Verizon’s claim that it is related to the fact that most organizations do not know the PCI DSS. After six years and three versions, I rarely run into an organization today that does not have a basic, overall understanding of the PCI DSS. These organizations may have some interesting ideas on what sections and requirements of the DSS mean, but they have definitely studied it and read about it. Therefore the idea that organizations are ignorant on the subject is far from the truth in my experience.

In my opinion, where the problem lies is that most organizations have not truly managed their technology environments thanks to interference with mergers and acquisitions, partially implemented applications, bring your own device (BYOD), the Cloud and the plethora of other disruptions that complicate organizations. Today, IT is a very important part of any organization, but it is not managed like it was in the “good old days”. There are too many stakeholders and the consumerization of technology has not helped the situation by making everyone an IT “expert”.

Most organization’s IT operations these days are a hodge-podge of technologies, applications and networks. I would equate it to the technological equivalent of a house’s attic and garage combined. We all know we should clean and straighten them out, but that project always sits on the back burner as there are other, more important or fun things to do.

As a result, for most organizations, there is just no easy way to simplify, segregate and isolate cardholder data (CHD) and comply with the PCI DSS without making the environment even more complex. Starting over is not an option for a lot of organizations.

That said I have encountered a few very brave organizations that have done just that, started over. Management at these organizations came to the realization that fixing the problem was too complex and expensive and that starting over was the cheaper, safer and easier way to go.

Uncertainty about Scope and Impact

“I don’t know much about PCI, but I do know my scope.” – Anonymous Manager to QSA

When application developers cannot explain how their applications work on a technical level. When anyone in any department can be in the IT business. When security personnel are order takers for firewall configuration changes reviewed and approved by management that have no clue as to the implications of those changes. When network people are providing a communications utility for communications traffic but have no idea how that traffic traverses the network.

Is it any wonder we have no idea how to scope a PCI assessment?

But there are larger problems as to why scoping is difficult. The root cause of why scoping is such an issue is that everyone’s risk tolerance is different. I drive race cars at very obscene speeds on race tracks (mostly) that I am sure a lot of people would view as insane. However, I think that people that skydive and do rock climbing are the insane ones. All of this points to everyone’s acceptance and avoidance of risk based on their own views.

There is a sidebar in the Verizon report calling the PCI SSC to provide guidance about scoping. Good luck with that. The Council had a scoping SIG a number of years ago that imploded due to the aforementioned issues with everyone’s risk tolerance. The result was a small band of people from the SIG that published the PCI Open Scoping Toolkit. The PCI Open Scoping Toolkit is not perfect, but it provides a framework to have an intelligent discussion about how to go about scoping and determine what is in-scope and why.

The key to solving the scoping issue resides with the organization, not their QSA, acquiring bank or any other external entity. Organizations need to use the PCI Open Scoping Toolkit to come up with their scoping framework and definitions. Once that has been agreed, then an organization needs to map out their applications and networks to determine their true scope. This is where tools from vendors such as Tufin, FireMon, SolarWinds and the like can provide assistance by documenting the network and then simulating data flows over the network.

With that approach, it is incumbent on QSAs and other auditors to accept these definitions for their assessment unless there is some significant or gross error in the organizations definitions. This will address the complaint that organizations have with QSAs. How often have we heard something such as, “The last QSA told us this was compliant.” If we all play by the same risk definitions the client has provided, then statements like that should go away.

Once an organization truly understands and has defined its scope, it can then understand the impact of existing operations and any changes.

The Compliance Cycle

This is what the Council is attempting to address with business as usual (BAU). The idea is that with security practices and monitoring embedded within an organization’s operations, security issues can be quickly identified and addressed before they become serious.

However, for this to work, organizations need to have their scope known as well has how their IT environment actually works. Without that knowledge, embedding the PCI DSS into the organization is a futile exercise.

Lack of Resources

Every organization is running “lean and mean” these days. Cost control is king. As a result, resources are stretched, sometimes to the point that any additional activities just cannot be accommodated without hiring someone. And hiring is not allowed. So implementing BAU is not going to go well if it goes at all.

On the information security front, finding qualified people is nearly impossible, even for consultancies. Organizations are finding that most information security professionals are heading to consultancies because the pay is better. Since security is hard on both the mind and the body, most people want to be reimbursed as much as possible for their efforts. As a result, most organizations cannot pay for in-house security resources. And then, even if they do ante up, typically the person that takes the position either gets bored once they fix everything, or gets frustrated when the organization refused to make required changes to ensure or enhance security.

Enter the managed security services provider or MSSP. The concept is that the MSSP provides the security talent at a more reasonable price yet organizations get the quality personnel needed to enhance and stabilize their security.

Where this goes wrong is that the MSSP and the customer are not on the same page as to each other’s responsibilities. This is from a mixture of sales people over promising as well as prospective customers hearing what they want to hear. Never mind that it is all documented in a contract.

To address this situation, the PCI SSC has come up with a new requirement, 12.8.5, which states:

“Verify the entity maintains information about which PCI DSS requirements are managed by each service provider, and which are managed by the entity.”

Under the v3 Attestation Of Compliance (AOC) form, this will not be as big a problem for an organization to maintain. However, if an organization has a lot of service providers and/or the service providers have v2 AOCs; this could be a very daunting task.

Lack of Insight in Existing Business Processes

“I’ve only been in this position for [2, 3 or 4] months. So I’m not fully up to speed on everything we do.” – Anonymous Manager to QSA

“I’d give you an organization chart, but it would be out of date by the time I printed it.” – Anonymous Human Resources Manager to QSA

In today’s fast changing business world, people get shuffled out of departments and divisions faster than people can manage the changes. As a result, finding anyone with any sort of insight into an organization’s business processes can be extremely difficult, if not impossible.

Then we go back to my earlier comment about lack of IT management. With the advent of the Cloud, some business divisions and departments have totally sidestepped the formal IT organization and set up their own operations in the Cloud. Did they know what they were doing? No! But that was beside the point, they at least now have IT solutions, never mind if they are secure or implemented properly. The only way to find these rogue operations is to quiz everyone in the organization about how they operate and what they use to operate.

Even then, I have run into situations where a new payment channel pops out of the woodwork at the last moment. Next year’s assessment issue or we will not get the one we are currently doing out the door.

Misplaced Confidence in Existing Information Security Maturity

A lot of organizations that have been doing IT for years and years get caught in this trap. Just because you have been doing IT for an eternity does not mean that you have been doing it right for the same amount of time or that you are doing it correctly now.

In a lot of IT organizations it is an unfortunate fact of life that areas such as special projects, business continuity planning or information security were used as those “safe” places to put the former IT Vice President or Manager out to pasture so they could retire. It did not matter if the individual could handle the job; it was a place to park someone and provide a gentle way out of the organization.

A rare few individuals made the transition and actually took up the challenge of mastering their new responsibilities. However, the vast majority just checked out, collected their pay check and then retired. This left the organization with a very immature security operation compared to the rest of IT’s operations. Add into the mix the changing landscape of IT with business divisions and departments doing their own thing unbeknownst to anyone and you can see how the maturity of information security could be easily misunderstood.

Then along comes the QSA to do the PCI gap analysis and it all comes to a head as the organization comes to the rude awakening that all is not as good as they thought and that significant gaps exist. To add insult to injury, the organization finds that fixing the gaps is going to take a lot longer than the 90 days they had set aside for that activity so that they could get their Report On Compliance (ROC) done in the same year.

The Verizon report is a great read and provides a lot of insights. Everyone should get a copy and read it, take it to heart and address your organization’s security shortcomings.

09
Dec
14

Significant Change And Periodic

UPDATED: Changed comments on requirement 10.6.2 to reflect the correct interpretation of that requirement.

No words or phrases in the PCI standards elicit more comments and questions than “significant change”, “periodic” and “periodically”.

So what do these mean?  Whatever you want to define them to mean as it is up to each organization to come up with formal definitions.  Those definitions should be based on your organization’s risk assessment.

Here are some suggestions as to appropriate definitions.

Significant Change

Significant changes are those changes that could impact or affect the security of your cardholder data environment (CDE).  Examples of significant changes are:

  • Changing devices such as firewalls, routers, switches and servers. Going from Cisco to Checkpoint firewalls for example is typically understood as a significant change.  However, people always question this concept particularly when going from a Cisco ASA 5505 firewall to an ASA 5520 or moving a virtual machine from one cluster to another.  The problem is that these moves can potentially introduce new vulnerabilities, network paths or even errors that would go unknown until the next vulnerability scan and penetration test.  And your luck would be that those tests are months away, not just a few days.
  • Changes to payment applications. This should be obvious, but I cannot tell you how many people argue the point on changes to applications.  Yet, application changes are possibly the biggest changes that can affect security.  Not only should applications be vulnerability scanned and penetration tested before being put into production, but code review and/or automated code scanning should be performed as well.  If any vulnerabilities are found, they must be corrected or mitigated before the application goes into production.
  • Upgrades or changes in operating systems. Upgrades and changes in operating systems should also be obvious as significant changes.  However, I have run into network and system administrators that want to split hairs over the impact of OS changes.  In my opinion, going from one version of an OS to another is just as significant as changing OSes.
  • Patching of operating systems or applications. While I do not think that patching necessarily results in a significant change, there are some patches such as updates to critical services such as .NET or the IP stack that should be considered significant.  If you are properly working through requirement 6.1 (6.2 in PCI DSS v2) for patch management, you should take this into consideration and indicate if vulnerability scanning and penetration testing are required after any particular patch cycle because of the nature of any of the patches being applied.
  • Network changes. Any time you change the network you should consider that a significant change regardless of how “minor” the change might appear.  Networks can be like puzzles and the movement of devices or wires can result in unintended paths being opened as a result.

I have a lot of clients that have an indicator in their change management system or enter “Significant Change” in the change comments for flagging significant changes.  That way they can try and coordinate significant changes with their scheduled vulnerability scanning and penetration testing.  It does not always work out, but they are trying to make an attempt at minimizing the number of special scans and tests that are performed.  But such an approach also has a side benefit when it comes time to do their PCI assessment as they can call up all significant changes and those can be tied to the vulnerability scans and penetration tests.

I would see this list as the bare minimum of significant changes.  As I stated earlier, it is up to your organization to develop your own definition of what constitutes a significant change.

Periodic and Periodically

Branden Williams was on a Podcast shortly after the PCI DSS v3 was released and made a comment that he felt that the number of occurrences for the words “periodic” or “periodically” were higher in the new version of the PCI DSS than in the previous version.  That got me thinking so I went and checked it out.  Based on my analysis, these words occur a total of 20 times in the PCI DSS v3 with 17 of those occurrences in the requirements/tests.  That is a 150% total increase over v2 and an increase of 113% in the requirements/tests.

First off, just to shatter some people’s perception of the word, “periodic” does not equate to “annual”.  Yes, there may be instances where an activity can occur annually and still meet PCI DSS compliance.  But that is likely a rare occurrence for all but the smallest organizations and is definitely not how the Council has defined it.

The Council uses the words “periodic” and “periodically” to reflect that an organization should be following the results of their risk assessment to determine how often or “periodically” they should perform a certain activity.  For some organizations, that might happen to work out to be annually.  But for most organizations it will work out to be something more often than annually.

So what requirements specific a periodic time period?  Here are some of the more notable occurrences.

  • 5.1.2 For systems considered to be not commonly affected by malicious software, perform periodic evaluations to identify and evaluate evolving malware threats in order to confirm whether such systems continue to not require anti-virus software.Typically this would be done annually, but forensic analysis of breaches has indicated that it needs to be done more often, particularly with Linux and other Unix derivatives. Based on threats semi-annual or even quarterly reviews may be needed for systems you believe to not warrant an anti-virus solution.
  • 5.2 Ensure that all anti-virus mechanisms are maintained as follows: Are kept current, Perform periodic scans, Generate audit logs which are retained per PCI DSS Requirement 10.7.Periodic scanning is always an issue with servers but, surprisingly, even more so with workstations. In my opinion, at a minimum, scans for viruses and malware should be done at least weekly.  This might need to be done daily if the systems are particularly at risk such as in call centers where the workstations my go to the Internet to be able to access competitor sales offerings.
  • 8.2.4.b Additional testing procedure for service providers: Review internal processes and customer/user documentation to verify that: Non-consumer user passwords are required to change periodically; and Non-consumer users are given guidance as to when, and under what circumstances, passwords must change.This requirement pairs with 8.6.2 which requires service providers with remote access to customers’ systems to not use the same credentials for each customer. A number of recent breaches have pointed out the issue such a practice can lead.  Not only are different credentials needed by the password for those credentials needs to change periodically, typically every 90 days.  This will likely spur the sales of enterprise credential vaults and similar solutions in the service provider ranks.But it is not just service provider’s credentials; it is also their customers’ credentials.  Service providers need to advise their customers to change their passwords periodically as well.  And that should also be at 90 day intervals at a minimum.
  • 9.7 Obtain and examine the policy for controlling storage and maintenance of all media and verify that the policy requires periodic media inventories.For this requirement, the PCI DSS already provides a required timeframe of at least annually.
  • 9.8 Examine the periodic media destruction policy and verify that it covers all media and defines requirements for the following:Periodic here typically means quarterly or even monthly if you have the volume of media to be destroyed. The key though is to secure the media until it is destroyed.
  • 9.9 Examine documented policies and procedures to verify they include: Maintaining a list of devices, Periodically inspecting devices to look for tampering or substitution, Training personnel to be aware of suspicious behavior and to report tampering or substitution of devices.Here periodic means at least daily, if not more often. I have clients that examine their points of interaction (POI) at every management shift change which works out to three or four times a day.  Given the POI is becoming the primary target of attacks, this will only become more important as time goes on given the current paradigm.
  • 9.9.2 Periodically inspect device surfaces to detect tampering (for example, addition of card skimmers to devices), or substitution (for example, by checking the serial number or other device characteristics to verify it has not been swapped with a fraudulent device).Again, periodic means at least daily, if not more often. I have clients that examine their points of interaction (POI) at every management shift change which works out to three or four times a day.  Given the POI is becoming the primary target of attacks, this will only become more important as time goes on given the current paradigm.
  • 10.6.2 Review logs of all other system components periodically based on the organization’s policies and risk management strategy, as determined by the organization’s annual risk assessment.This requirement allows systems to be ranked using an organization’s risk assessment to drive how often log data from systems have to be reviewed.  While systems that directly process, store or transmitcardholder data (CHD) must have their log data reviewed at least daily, other systems that are in-scope can have their log data reviewed less often based on the risk they present to the CDE systems.  Based on assessing the risk to these “connected to” systems, you might be able to justify weekly or even monthly review of log data. I doubt this will have a significant impact because most organizations have implemented internal or outsourced system information and event management (SIEM) solutions and are monitoring all in-scope systems in near real time.  But for those few organizations that are struggling with log reviews without a SIEM, this will afford them a bit of breathing space.
  • 12.10.4 Verify through observation, review of policies, and interviews of responsible personnel that staff with responsibilities for security breach response are periodically trained.It amazes me the number of organizations that claim to not have had an incident in the last year, even a virus or malware outbreak. Either they were totally dealt with by their anti-virus solution (hard to believe) or I am not talking to thepeople that deal with these issues (probably more likely).  As a result, testing (which can satisfy this training requirement) is only being done annually just like business continuity plan testing.Given the ever increasing amount of threats, this sort of training needs to be done more often than just annually.  Organizations should be at least testing their incident response plan on a quarterly basis so that people keep their skills up as well we just exercising the plan and finding any gaps or processes that need adjustment.

Hopefully we are now all on the same page with these terms.

23
Nov
14

Face It, You Are A Poor Judge Of Risk

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.” HP Lovecraft

We have a pop quiz today.

  1. Are you more likely to die from an alligator attack or a shark attack?
  2. Are you more likely to win the PowerBall lottery jackpot or become a movie star?
  3. Are you more likely to die in a vending machine accident or from a lightning strike?
  4. Are you more likely to be elected President of the United States or to date a supermodel?
  5. Are you more likely to die from influenza or from drowning?
  6. Are you more likely to catch influenza or Ebola?

The purpose of this pop quiz is to demonstrate how poorly we humans evaluate and understand risks. I have to admit I got caught on a couple of these as I did the research.

If anything, the Ebola discussion has brought this issue of risk judgment to the forefront given the unfounded fear people have of Ebola. As a mathematician by schooling it has fascinated me as I watch the media reports and government officials cave into the spread of fear over something very highly unlikely to occur to anyone in the general population.

Do not get me wrong. If I were a health care worker anywhere in the world, I would have concerns about my risk of catching Ebola. After all, they are on the front line and Ebola has around a 50% fatality rate. Add into that the informative, but frightening, video that Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN did on the difficulty of removing a containment suit without potentially infecting yourself, and it confirms the threat a health care worker should be feeling if confronted with a potential Ebola patient that is symptomatic.

But for anyone outside of health care, there should be little if any reason to be concerned. Yet a good percentage of the public is irrational when it comes to Ebola regardless of the fact that it requires contact with a symptomatic person’s bodily fluids in order to be infected. But unlike a person with influenza, an Ebola infected person that is contagious does not have the mobility required to have contact with people unless those people come to them. As a result, all of these mental gymnastics that people go through about the possibility that an infection could occur on a bus or the subway are silly because the person with Ebola when they are contagious would look worse than a zombie off of ‘The Walking Dead’, assuming they could even walk at that point.

I am sure you are all saying that this is all good and well, but what is the point here in regards to PCI?

Glad you asked. I bring this up because the PCI DSS is heading more and more to be driven by risk and the assessment of that risk. Yet as I have hopefully shown by my quiz questions, people and their organizations are poor at understanding and determining risks. So organizations need to get much better at performing risk assessments (if they are performed at all) so that they can truly understand and manage risks. That said, a risk assessment does not have to be, nor should it be, a huge “death march” of a project. A proper risk assessment should answer the following questions.

  • What are the risks to the organization? This does not have to be an exhaustive, all inclusive list as you find in the various risk assessment methodology frameworks. But should include all of the most likely risks. For PCI compliance, this risk assessment only needs to address the risks to those things that are in-scope for the assessment. However, most organizations need the risk assessment for other reasons, so it often contains all risks, not just PCI risks. If it does contain risks outside of PCI, you should add columns for your other requirements so you can filter out just the PCI, HIPAA, GLBA, FISMA and any other risk frameworks.
  • What is the likelihood of the risk occurring? Typically, I use a scale of 1 to 5 where 1 is it occurs infrequently and 5 represents that it occurs often. If something never occurs, then it should be removed from the list.
  • If the risk occurs, what is the impact on the organization? Here I use a scale of 1 to 3 where 1 is low, 2 is moderate and 3 is high.
  • Multiply the likelihood with the impact and you get the risk rating.
  • Sort the risk ratings from highest to lowest and you have your risk assessment rating completed.

But hold on, you are not done just yet. Now you need to set your organization’s risk threshold. This will likely be a very contentious discussion as you will find that people within the organization have widely differing views on the level of risk they are willing to accept. However, it is important to capture the highlights of this discussion so that you have documentation for future discussions as you discuss future risk assessment results and reset the organization’s risk threshold.

Risks that fall below a certain risk rating are accepted and management formally agrees to accept them. Those above that level you develop methods of mitigating and managing those risks. Under my rating system, the lowest score that can be achieved is 1 and the highest score is 15. A lot of organizations might say that a total score of below 4 is to be accepted. For some organizations a better approach to accepting risk is sometimes to only accept those risks that have an impact of ‘Low’ (i.e., equal to 1). Therefore, all moderate and high impact risks are mitigated and managed.

Once you have your analysis done you will have a list of risks that require mitigation and management through monitoring and other methods.

Answers

  1. According to the Florida Museum of Natural History, between 1948 and 2005 there were 391 alligator attacks resulting in 18 fatalities whereas there were 592 shark attacks with 9 fatalities. That makes the alligator fatality rate almost three times as high as the shark fatality rate.
  2. The odds of winning the PowerBall are around one in 175M. While still incredibly long, the odds of becoming a movie star are significantly lower at one in 1.5M.
  3. Lightning is more deadly but do not underestimate that vending machine. According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the odds of being hit by lightning in the US are one in 1.9M. According to the US National Safety Council, there is a one in 112M chance of dying in a vending machine accident.
  4. The odds are in your favor if you are interested in dating a supermodel. Even better than becoming a movie star. You have a one in 88K chance of dating a supermodel according to Ask the Odds. The odds of being elected President are slim at one in 10M.
  5. The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimate that the odds of drowning are one in 31.4. The CDC estimates that the odds of dying from influenza are around one in 345K.
  6. The CDC estimates that one in eight people will catch the flu in any given year and as seen in a previous answer, there is a one in 345K chance that a person will die as a result. Given the population of the US is around 315M and only four people have actually caught the Ebola virus in the US, there is around a one in 78M chance of catching Ebola in the US but that could change slightly if more infected people enter the US.
12
Oct
14

Lawyer Or Security Professional?

“It depends upon what the meaning of the word ‘is’ is. If ‘is’ means ‘is and never has been’ that’s one thing – if it means ‘there is none’, that was a completely true statement.” –President of The United States of America, William Clinton

It has been an interesting time as the December 31, 2014 deadline approaches and version 2 of the PCI DSS comes to its end of life.  I have started to notice that there are a lot of security professionals and others that are closet lawyers based on the discussions I have had with some of you regarding compliance with the PCI DSS.

The first thing I want to remind people of is that if you do not want to comply with one or more of the PCI DSS requirements, all you have to do is write a position paper defining for each requirement you find onerous, why it is not relevant or not applicable for your environment and get your management and acquiring bank to sign off on that paper.  But stop wasting your QSA’s or ISA’s time with your arguments.  It is not that we do not care, but without such approval from your management and acquiring bank, QSAs and ISAs cannot let you off the hook for any requirement.

With that said, the first lawyerly argument we are dealing with these days revolves around the December deadline.  We continue to get into arguments over what the deadline actually means.

It appears that the PCI SSC and card brands’ repeatedly saying that version 2 is done as of December 31, 2014 was not clear enough for some of you.  And further clarifications from them that any reports submitted after that date must be under version 3 are also apparently too much for some of you to handle.  I do not know how there could be any misinterpretation of ‘DEADLINE’, ‘DONE’ or “AFTER THAT DATE’ but apparently, there are a lot of people out in the world that do not understand such words and phrases.  Then there are the amazing contortions that some people will go to in a twisted dance to the death to get around this deadline.

Where have you been?  How could you have missed this deadline?  It has been known since the PCI SSC announced their change when standard updates would be issued back with the release of the PCI DSS v2 more than three years ago.  But even assuming you were not involved back then, the PCI SSC announced the deadline over a year ago with the release of PCI DSS v3.  Either way, it certainly should not have been a surprise as there has been plenty of warning.

But then do not take this out on your QSA.  QSAs are just the messenger in this process and had nothing to do with setting the deadline.  The PCI SSC and the card brands set that deadline.  You have a problem with the deadline, complain to them.  But if you are willing to listen, I can save you that discussion.  They will politely tell you the deadline is the deadline.  You are out of luck.  If you do not like that answer, then stop taking credit/debit cards for payment for your organization’s goods and services.

The next lawyerly argument is around the June 30, 2015 deadlines for requirements 6.5.10, 8.5.1, 9.9, 11.3 and 12.9.  Again, it is as though these dates were kept from you, which they were not.  I even wrote a post about these requirements titled ‘Coming Attractions’ back in September 2013.

For those that are calendar challenged, June 30, 2015 is practically just around the corner in business terms.  If you had years to get ready for the PCI DSS v3, what makes you think that you can just turn something on in a year and a half?  Yet we continually see people arguing that until that date, they are not going to address any of these requirements.  All as though, like a light switch, something magical will occur on July 1, 2015 that will meet those requirements.

For merchants, requirements 9.9 and 11.3 are going to be huge issues particularly for those of you with large networks and lots of retail outlets.  If you have not gotten started on these requirements now, there is no way you will be compliant with these requirements by July 1.  Both of these require thought, planning and training.  They cannot just be started overnight resulting in compliance.

For requirement 11.3, the new approach required for penetration testing is resulting in vulnerabilities being uncovered.  Organizations that did not want to get caught flat footed are finding that their network segmentation is not as segmented as they once believed.  They are also finding new “old” vulnerabilities because of these network segmentation issues.  The bottom line is that these early adopters are scrambling to address their penetration testing issues.  In some cases ACLs need to be adjusted, but I have a few that have found they need to re-architect their networks in order to get back to compliance.  Obviously the latter is not an overnight kind of fix.

Requirement 9.9 is all about ensuring the security of points of interaction (POI) as card terminals are referred.  Because of all of the POI tampering and hacks that have occurred, the Council has added the requirements in 9.9 to minimize that threat.  The biggest problems early adopters are running into is getting their retail management and cashiers trained so that they understand the threats and know how to deal with those threats.  This requires creating new procedures for daily or more often inventorying of the POIs and visually inspecting them to ensure they have not been tampered with.  Companies are rolling out serialized security tape that must be applied to the seams of POIs so that any opening of the case can be visually determined.  Locking cradles are being installed for every POI to secure them to the counter.  Let alone implementing those new procedures for doing at least daily inspections and what to do if you suspect tampering and how to inform corporate of potential issues.  Again, not something that just happens and works day one.

For service providers, besides 11.3, requirement 8.5.1 is going to be their biggest issue.  This requires the service provider to use different remote access credentials for every customer.  This is in response to the breaches that occurred at a number of restaurants in Louisiana a few years ago as well as more recent breaches.

The problem that early adopters of 8.5.1 are finding is that implementing enterprise-wide credential vaults is not as simple as it appears.  The biggest impact with these implementations is that service providers start missing their service level agreements (SLA).  Missing SLAs typically costs money.  So these service providers are not only incurring the costs related to implementing the credential vault solution, but they are suffering SLA issues that just pile on the injuries.

But the final straw is all of the people that closely parse the PCI DSS and only the DSS.  You saw this with some of the questions asked at the latest Community Meeting.  You also see it in the questions I get on this blog and the prospects and I clients I deal with daily.  These people are hunting for a way to get around complying with a particular requirement.

This occurs because people only read the DSS and not the Glossary, information supplements and other documents provided by the Council.  At least with v3 of the DSS the Council included the Guidance for each of the requirements.  Not that adding Guidance makes a whole lot of difference based on the arguments laid out by some people.  The Council could do us all a favor if they generally published the Reporting Template with all of the other documents.  Not so much that people would necessarily read it, but it would give QSAs and ISAs more ammunition to use when these discussions come up.

Successful security professionals understand the purpose of security frameworks.  These frameworks are meant to share the collective knowledge and lessons learned regarding security with everyone so that everyone can have a leg up and know ways of detecting and mitigating threats.  Successful security professionals use these frameworks to get things done, not waste their time developing scholarly legal arguments or twisting the English language as to why they do not need to meet some security requirement.  They put their heads down, review the frameworks, develop plans to implement the changes necessary to improve security, work the plan and deliver results.  Do those plans always meet requirement deadline dates?  Not always, but they are close or as close as they can get given other business issues.

The bottom line is that security professionals are not lawyers and good security professionals certainly do not sound like lawyers.  But if you constantly find yourself sounding like a lawyer digging so deep to split legal hairs, in my very humble opinion, you really need to re-examine your career or lack thereof.  I say lack thereof because, in my experience, security professionals that operate like lawyers do not have long careers.  They move around a lot because once people realize that they cannot deliver, they are forced to move on.  Eventually a reputation is developed and after that point these people end up forced to find a new career because the security community knows their modus operandi.

01
Aug
14

The Dilemma Of PCI Scoping – Part 2

In Part 1 I discussed how isolation is an answer, but probably not a viable answer for almost all but the most security conscientious of organizations such as the military, defense contractors or those that can afford that sort of painstaking luxury.  So unless you consider everything in scope for PCI compliance, is there a viable way to reduce scope?

Before we get to that though, we need a quick discussion on risk management as the solution is all predicated on the identification and management of risk.  Because if you cannot do an appropriate risk assessment, then the only choice you really have is to consider everything in scope I know the vast majority of you do not like that approach.

Assessing Risk

In order for my proposed solution to have a chance at working properly, an organization needs to understand its risks, what risks will be accepted and managed and what it will take mitigate the residual risks.  Doing a risk assessment is the way to do that, but most organizations avoid such an assessment for a variety of reasons.  The most common reasons I have heard are:

  • The risk assessment framework is too complex,
  • We tried this once before and never got any meaningful results,
  • We were never able to agree on the risks and their scores, or my personal favorite,
  • This spreadsheet is our risk assessment (it is not, but see Tom Benhave’s blog post on the topic as he does a much better job than I could explaining this topic).

The reason why risk is such a tough topic is that everyone has their own perspective on risk; good, bad or otherwise.  There are numerous articles and presentations on this phenomena but my favorite one is from Lance Spitzner of SANS who wrapped his around security awareness training and discusses risk at the start of his presentation describing why people are such poor judges of risk.  He uses various statistics regarding events that can happen in people’s lives to illustrate this fact.  My personal favorite example of just such a statistic is that people have a greater chance of dating a supermodel than of winning the PowerBall lottery.  Granted, both have tremendous odds, but the odds of dating a supermodel are still significantly less than the odds of winning the PowerBall.

The bottom line is that, without a decent risk assessment, an organization has no way to know the amount of risk the organization is willing to accept and how they will manage that risk.  The Council has repeatedly said that PCI compliance is supposed to consider risk and take a “risk-based” approach.  However, the problem is that we each have our own opinion of risk and what risks we are willing to take on.  But at the end of the day, no matter what an organization does, there is going to be risk.  The question is, “Are these risks my organization willing to take on?”  That question can only be answered by a risk assessment and an understanding of how risks can be managed and mitigated.

How your organization chooses which risks it is will to accept and how to manage those remaining risks are up to your organization to decide.  This is why the PCI DSS and all other security frameworks require an annual risk assessment to be performed.  The risk assessment process provides a framework for an organization to document their risks, understand those risks (size, frequency of occurrence, costs, etc.), how the risks can be managed or mitigated, then agree to what risks they will take on and how they will manage and/or mitigate those risks.

From here on we will assume that the organization has a valid risk assessment and that they are willing to take on the risks presented by the example I will discuss.

Managing Risk

Today’s integrated and connected world just does not lend itself to an isolationist approach due to the volume of information involved, business efficiencies lost and/or the operational costs such an approach incurs.  As a result, organizations need to take a hybrid approach of heavily protecting some components and taking on and managing the risks inherent to such an approach.

When it comes to the IT side of risk management and mitigation, most organizations rely on some form of near real time monitoring through collected system/event log data and other sources to monitor their environment(s).  Unfortunately, where this approach comes up short is that there are too many alerts to follow up and so alerts go unaddressed.  Almost every QSA can tell you about a discussion with operations personnel where the statement, “Oh, that’s a false positive alert, so I don’t have to worry about it” has been made.

This is the first problem you must address and make sure that this attitude never creeps back into your people that monitor alerts.  Anyone in operations that “knows” an alert is a false positive needs either: (1) re-education, or (2) your organization needs to seriously re-tune your alerting mechanism(s).  All you have to do is read the Target and Neiman Marcus press reports if you need examples of how bad things can get if your personnel are blowing off alerts because they believe they are not accurate.

In my experience, a lot of these problems are the result of bad or incomplete implementations of these systems.  Unfortunately, there are a lot of people out there that think that these solutions are more like a Ronco Rotisserie Oven where, as they famously say in the ads, “you can set it and forget it.”  Yes these solutions may be “appliances”, but that is where the comparison ends.

System incident and event management (SIEM) systems require fairly constant tuning and tweaking, beyond their own software and signature updates, to minimize false positive alerts in response to the changes to an organization’s networks and systems.  Yet time and again, I encounter monitoring and alerting systems that were put in place years ago (typically to meet PCI compliance) and have not been adjusted/changed since then while all around them changes have been occurring that affect their operation.

When interviewing the people responsible for these systems I hear statements such as, “Yeah, that alert started to appear when we implemented [name of change].  We were told to just ignore it.”  When asked why they have not tuned it out of the SIEM, you get either they do not have time, they do not know how, they do not have the rights to do that or, my personal favorite, the head of security or the security committee will not let us change that.

The reason this issue does not get addressed is that it has no visibility since alerts are tucked into the various monitoring tools.  So, the best way to address this situation is to give it visibility by automatically feeding all alerts into an organization’s help desk system.  This gives all alerts immediate visibility by putting them in an automated tracking and escalation process.  It also allows for triage and investigation activities to be documented and, based on the results of those triage and investigation activities, having the alert assigned to the right people/groups to address the alerts.

“Whoa, let’s not get crazy here,” I am sure some of you are YELLING at the screen.  There is no doubt this is a very brave step to take because this will potentially uncover something you probably did not want to advertise given the state of your existing alerting.  But that is typically only be a short term problem.  Unfortunately, it may be the only way to get the underlying problem of tuning and tweaking of the alerting systems completed and constantly addressed.

But taking such a step is not entirely a bad thing, at least in the long run.  A side benefit of doing such a thing is that it will focus an organization on triage activities for classifying the urgency of the alerts.  Not all alerts need immediate action, but a lot of them can require immediate investigation and then can be put on a back burner.  It will also give visibility to the number of alerts being dealt with on a daily basis after triage.  That typically results in identifying and justify why more staff are required to deal with the onslaught of alerts that need to be researched.

Another change that organizations should make is adding a box into their change control form that indicates what the impact of a change will have on the SIEM environment.  At least these three basic questions need to be answered in regards to SIEM or other monitoring systems.

  • Do new alerts need to be added and, if so, what do they need to monitor and what are the alerting thresholds?
  • Do existing alerts need to be modified and, if so, what modifications are needed?
  • Are there alerts that are no longer needed?

If you address these areas, you should have monitoring and alerting taken care of with a built in feedback loop to keep it that way.

In Part 3, I am going to wrap up my discussion on PCI scoping with a discussion of Category 2 and 3 systems.

26
Apr
14

Why SAQ A-EP Makes Sense

A colleague of mine attended the PCI SSC QSA Update session at the ETA convention a couple of weeks back.  One of the big discussion items was how the Council is being pilloried over SAQ A-EP.  This SAQ was developed to address the recommendations that were documented in the information supplement titled ‘PCI DSS E-commerce Guidelines’ that was published in January 2013.  Specifically, SAQ A-EP addresses the ecommerce sites that do redirects to a processor’s site that does the actual payment processing.

Based on the comments I have seen online and made in personal conversations, you would think that SAQ A-EP was heresy or a bad joke.  All of these derogatory comments are being driven by merchants that were sold a bill of goods by slick, non-PCI informed, sales people pushing redirected ecommerce solutions by claiming that it put the merchant entirely out of scope.  This was not the case and never was the case, particularly after the issuance of the information supplement.  However, we still encounter outsourcing vendors that continue to claim a redirect approach puts the merchant entirely out of scope.

To understand the rationale of SAQ A-EP we need to understand the risk surrounding these redirect solutions.  The risk is that an attacker modifies the redirect on the merchant’s server to now point to their own payment page, collects the customer’s cardholder data (CHD) on the attacker’s page and then, optionally, passes the customer on to the original payment page at the processor so the customer and merchant are none the wiser.

Under the PCI DSS and card brands’ security programs, redirect systems are still in-scope for PCI compliance because they are a key control in the payment process even though the merchant’s server issuing the redirect does not come into direct contact with CHD.

With all of that said, SAQ A-EP is not a full SAQ D, but it is not as short and simple as SAQ A either.  There are a lot of requirements to be met with SAQ A-EP which is why merchants are up in arms.  However, if you understand the aforementioned risk, you should understand why the requirements that have to be complied with in SAQ A-EP are there.

The requirement 1 requirements are all there to ensure that there is a firewall protecting the server that does the redirect.  This is Security 101 and I would doubt that any merchant would not have a firewall protecting all of their Internet facing servers.  Routers have always been optional and if the merchant does not have control of those devices, then they would not be included here.

Requirement 2 is all about making sure that all devices in the cardholder data environment (CDE) are properly configured and security hardened.  Again, this is Security 101 stuff.  If a merchant is not doing this for Internet facing devices, they are just begging to be attacked and compromised.

The requirements called out in SAQ A-EP for requirement 3 are there to confirm that the merchant is not storing cardholder data (CHD) or sensitive authentication data (SAD).  A merchant using a redirect should be marking these as Not Applicable (NA) and documenting that they do not store CHD in their system(s) because they use a redirect that processes and transmits CHD directly between their processor and their customer.  Any merchant that answers these requirements any other way should not be using SAQ A-EP.  All of that said, merchants need to have proof that they examined logs, trace files, history files, databases, etc. and did not find any CHD or SAD in those files.

Requirement 4 is provided to ensure that secure communications are used.  I would recommend documenting the SSL/TLS certificate information for your processor for the requirements in 4.1.  But do not pass over requirement 4.2.  A lot of ecommerce only merchants have call centers or take telephone calls and do order entry into the same Web site used by their customers.  As a result, merchants need to make sure that email, instant messaging, etc. are never used for communicating CHD/SAD.

Requirement 10 is important for any forensic research should the redirect be manipulated so that it can be determined when that event occurred so that the scope of any compromise can be determined.

While one would think that the vulnerability scanning and penetration testing requirements in requirement 11 would be thought of Security 101 and self-explanatory, you would be surprised at how many merchants argue about that fact.  Again, the driver of these redirect solutions was cost reduction and vulnerability scanning and penetration testing incur costs, sometimes significant costs depending on the number of servers, firewalls, load balancers, switches, etc. involved.  If you do not do vulnerability scanning and penetration testing as required, how do you know that the redirect system(s) are properly secured and patched?

However, the key requirement that cannot be missed is requirement 11.5 regarding critical file monitoring.  That is because the whole security of the redirect environment is pinned on detecting any modification of the redirect URL.  All of the other requirements in SAQ A-EP are there to minimize the risk of compromising the redirect.  11.5 is there to ensure that, if the other controls fail, at least the merchant would be alerted to the fact that the redirect had been changed.  If a modification to the redirect cannot be reliably detected by the critical file monitoring solution, then the security of the redirect cannot be assured.

The remaining requirements for 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 12 are all Security 101 items.  If you are not following these requirements as part of best practices for security and IT operations in general, then you need to consider what exactly you are doing.

Hopefully everyone now understands SAQ A-EP and why it is not as simple as that slick sales person implied.

07
Dec
13

POS Botnets

Just in time for the holidays.

An article came out this past week regarding botnets that are specifically targeting point of sale (POS) systems.  The reason I bring this up is because of this quote.

“StarDust developers have intimate knowledge of the inner workings of PoS applications such as Clearview PoS.  As a result, the malware can ferret out where in computer memory sensitive data, in some cases in cleartext form, is stored.  StarDust can also sniff network traffic and is able to extract Track1 and Track2 card data.  To remain covert, the software transfers card details only when the terminal is inactive and the screensaver is on. It also uses the RC4 cipher to encrypt data before sending it to the control server.”

Obviously, if your organization uses Clearview POS software you should probably be examining your systems and networks to ensure that they have not been compromised by StarDust.

However, the larger issue is that most merchants do not see themselves as targets of such attacks, let alone have they constructed a secure environment for their POS systems.  Some of this is not entirely the merchant’s fault.  A lot of merchants outsource the maintenance and management of their POS systems to a value added reseller (VAR) and that VAR is the one responsible for the POS network configuration.  Regardless of responsibility, a merchant needs to be aware of these threats and take appropriate action either internally or with their VAR to address these threats and minimize risk.

Regardless of whether it is StarDust or a similar threat, here are some steps you can take to minimize and detect such threats.

  • Segment your POS network from the rest of your internal network and limit POS network segment traffic to only communication to your processor and internal network and system support and operations systems.  This will require the development of network access rules so that traffic can only reach your processor or internal system support and operations systems.  This will limit the number of systems that could compromise your POS environment.
  • Monitor your POS network segment for any traffic that is directed to an external network other than your processor or system support and operations systems.  Your firewall rules should only allow secure connections between your POS network and your processor or your system support and operations systems.  Network traffic going anywhere else should be stopped and reported for further investigation.
  • Monitor your POS systems for any file or configuration changes.  Most anti-virus solutions can provide this capability, but there are also solutions that are specifically engineered for this task.  Regardless of which you choose, configure the tool to alert you as soon as it identifies a potential change to files or configuration of the POS system.  If approved changes were not made to the POS systems and you received an alert, you likely have been compromised.
  • Develop an incident response plan should you receive an alert indicating that your POS systems have been compromised.  An incident response plan provides the organization with a “battle plan” should a compromise occur.  This type of plan is key to minimize the potential reputational impact to the organization should such an attack be confirmed.  A good incident response plan can keep you from making mistakes as you navigate the mine field that is the media circus that comes with a breach.

Three straight forward and simple steps that can minimize the threat of StarDust and a documented incident response process should you unfortunately be breached.

Security does not have to be rocket science.

24
Sep
13

Coming Attractions

On September 12, 2013 the PCI SSC released the drafts of version 3 of the PCI DSS and PA-DSS.  In reviewing the PCI DSS, there are six new requirements that will be considered ‘best practices’ until July 1, 2015 when they will become requirements.

  • 6.5.6 – Insecure handling of PAN and SAD in memory.
  • 6.5.11 – Broken Authentication and Session Management
  • 8.5.1 – Service providers with access to customer environments must use a unique authentication credential (such as a password/phrase) for each customer environment.
  • 9.9 – Protect point-of-sale (POS) devices that capture payment card data via direct physical interaction with the card from tampering and substitution.
  • 11.3 – Develop and implement a methodology for penetration testing that: is based on industry-accepted penetration testing approaches (for example, NIST SP800-115), includes coverage for the entire CDE perimeter and critical systems, includes testing from both inside the network, and from outside of the network attempting to get in, includes testing to validate any segmentation and scope-reduction controls, defines application-layer penetration tests to include, at a minimum, the vulnerabilities listed in Requirement 6.5, defines network-layer penetration tests to include components that support network functions as well as operating systems, includes review and consideration of threats and vulnerabilities experienced in the last 12 months, and specifies retention of penetration testing results and remediation activities results.
  • 12.9 – Additional requirement for service providers: Service providers acknowledge in writing to customers that they will maintain all applicable PCI DSS requirements to the extent the service provider handles, has access to, or otherwise stores, processes, or transmits the customer’s cardholder data or sensitive authentication data, or manages the customer’s cardholder data environment on behalf of a customer.

I will discuss requirements 6.5.6 and 11.3 in separate posts.  I am not going to discuss 6.5.6 until I have a better understanding of how the PCI SSC expects QSAs to test that memory is being managed properly.  I am avoiding 11.3 because it contains enough for a post of its own.  But the others can be addressed in this post.

First, I have to say that I was amazed that these actually had to be codified as they are addressed through a number of other requirements.  But having run into numerous instances where I have encountered these situations, I understand why the PCI SSC felt the need to explicitly codify them.

For requirement 6.5.11, the guidance provided states:

“Secure authentication and session management prevents unauthorized individuals from compromising legitimate account credentials, keys, or session tokens that would otherwise enable the intruder to assume the identity of an authorized user. “

This requirement is targeting the botnets and Trojan attacks such as with Citadel and Zeus.  The problem here is that these are attacks on the end user, not the merchant.  As a result, what this new requirement is going to likely be looking for is for the merchant to be using methods to secure authentication and communications such that man-in-the-middle, man-in-the-browser and similar attacks are minimized or even eliminated.  It will be interesting to see how the PCI SSC expects this to be accomplished.

It has been a long time coming for 8.5.1.  Most QSAs have encountered this situation and we never liked it.  The situation that I speak of is managed service providers and software vendors using the same user identifier and password for all of their customers which they support.  While one can appreciate why this occurs, it does create a problem should those common credentials become known outside of the organization which has been the case in a number of breaches.  As a result, the PCI DSS has been changed to include this new requirement to require managed service providers and software vendors to use unique authentication credentials with each customer.

Requirement 9.9 is to explicitly address a best practice that has been used by a lot of merchants.  A number of merchants have experienced the tampering of card terminals over the years.  This typically was in the form of soldering a USB thumb drive or SD card into the terminal to collect track data and then replacing a good terminal with the doctored terminal at the merchant.  This threat is typically mitigated by video monitoring of terminals as well as the use of serialized security tape or tamper evident seals over a terminal’s case seams that is checked at least daily to ensure that terminals have not been changed out or tampered with.

And finally, requirement 12.9 calls out that service providers explicitly acknowledge in a document that they will maintain compliance with the PCI DSS for all relevant services.  Apparently the existing requirements in 12.8 were not providing enough assurance that service providers were complying with the PCI DSS.  So now we are going to require that all service providers acknowledge, in writing, that they will maintain compliance with all relevant PCI DSS requirements for all services provided to their customers.




Welcome to the PCI Guru blog. The PCI Guru reserves the right to censor comments as they see fit. Sales people beware! This is not a place to push your goods and services.

February 2023
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728