Archive for the 'PCI SSC' Category

05
Jul
17

NESA – Guidance In Search Of A Problem

On Thursday, June 29, the PCI SSC held their quarterly Assessor update webinar.  One of the more interesting discussions was on the topic of the non-listed encryption solution assessment or NESA.

For those unfamiliar with NESA, it is an attempt by the Council to have all end-to-end encryption (E2EE) solutions such as First Data’s TransArmor and Verifone’s Verishield assessed against the relevant PCI P2PE standards to ensure they are secure.  The problem is that the card brands and the banks have not gotten behind the NESA approach so it has effectively stalled out much like the P2PE program has stalled out.  But on the Thursday webinar we found out that it has really stalled out and the Council seems to be getting desperate to salvage it.

The goals of NESA are:

  • The Council reiterated that the NESA requires that a P2PE-QSA is required to conduct the assessment using the PCI P2PE assessment programs as guidance. Essentially, the NESA is a P2PE validation without the Council’s certification and listing of the solution on the Council’s Web site.
  • NESA provides a consistent approach to evaluating non-listed encryption solutions against “best practices”.
  • It provides other PCI assessors, acquiring banks and merchants with information about the risk and PCI DSS responsibilities when using a non-listed encryption solution.
  • It provides input to a merchant’s QSA to consider when conducting the merchant’s PCI assessment.

All of these are admirable goals of the NESA.  But the question still remains, do we need the NESA?

According to the Council a lot of people in the “payments community” have been clamoring for NESA.  I am not sure exactly who the Council is referring to as the “payments community” but it certainly has not been the banks or the brands.  Those two constituencies are already partnered up with E2EE and P2PE solutions and have not been clamoring for anything other than to use those solutions.

The Council did bring up the organizations behind the solutions already listed as P2PE validated.  That would make sense as they have a vested interest in forcing non-listed encryption solutions through the process.  But as to banks, the brands and QSAs pushing this agenda?  I would seriously doubt it.

Then there is the issue that the Council says that QSAs are stumped when they encounter an E2EE solution.  The process of assessing E2EE solutions has been known by QSAs since E2EE solutions were rolled out years ago by the various vendors.  But with the introduction of P2PE, I would bet that the Council’s QSA/ISA training does not cover how to handle E2EE solutions.  And I am sure since the invention of the NESA process, they have even more reasons not to instruct QSAs on how to assess an E2EE solution.  Yet I am sure that they still discuss how to assess an application that is not PA-DSS validated.  That is a “shame on them” for ignoring the realities of the real world.

But the process is not that involved.  When encountering an E2EE solution, the QSA needs to ensure that the E2EE solution is implemented according to its implementation guide (IG).  A transaction processor/gateway or an acquiring bank may also require packet captures to ensure that the data stream is encrypted.  All of that assessment and testing documentation is submitted to the acquiring bank and the bank explicitly grants the merchant scope reduction.  Then the QSA can follow the requirements in SAQ P2PE for an assessment.  All of which adds probably two hours to a merchant’s PCI assessment versus the costs of a full on P2PE assessment.  When looking at the costs of a P2PE assessment plus the listing fees to have the solution placed on the Council’s Web site, is there any wonder a lot of E2EE solution providers have eschewed the P2PE program.

First Data and Verifone have been adamant since P2PE was introduced that they will never go through P2PE because it is not needed.  Given they are partnered with most of the large processors and banks, their lack of support for P2PE means a lot and also means that until they get on board with either NESA or P2PE, both of these standards are in trouble.

But the most troubling comments occurred at the end of the Council’s brief discussion of NESA.

  • NESA is NOT a program. It is only “guidance”.
  • NESA may not result in scope reduction.
  • There is no formal NESA documentation or template.

When the Council says that something is “guidance”, there is no mandate for anyone to do anything.  This is how QSAs are to treat those Information Supplements published periodically by the Council.  In this case, NESA is only a suggestion.  So, until the brands and banks get behind the NESA process, there is no reason to have a NESA performed.

The next two comments go together.  If there is no formal deliverable for QSAs to review, how does a QSA evaluate that any NESA process was conducted adequately?  And if that is the case, of course the granting of scope reduction is not likely.  After all, if a QSA is not sure about the NESA, how is the bank supposed to evaluate it let alone pay for it.  And if scope reduction is not achieved, then what in the world is the point of NESA in the first place?  The only purpose I can see is to give P2PE QSACs an ability to push their services on the E2EE solution vendors to make their services worth the cost incurred with the Council.

The only other benefit that I can see is an opportunity for certain P2PE-QSACs to flood us all with NESA Certificates since their PCI Compliance certificates are worthless.

But in the end, you really start to wonder what the Council was thinking when they put this process together.  Time will tell, but I am guessing and hoping that NESA, like P2PE, will die a quick and quiet death.

09
Jun
17

We Need A Change To 2.3.b

I just wanted to give everyone a “heads up” about some guidance we recently received from the PCI SSC regarding jump boxes or out-of-band (OOB) system management solutions and the use of insecure protocols such as SNMPv1/2 and Telnet.

But did everyone know that this solution also requires a compensating control worksheet (CCW)?

For years (at least since the Phoenix Community Meeting years ago), the Council has been recommending the use of firewalls and jump boxes as a way to secure instances where organizations need to use insecure protocols.  These enclaves are firewalled, VLAN’d and configured so that only the jump box can be used to remotely connect to the devices over Telnet and allowing other insecure protocols to be kept away from other networks.  However, I do not recall any of those discussions ever explicitly calling out the need for a CCW.  I suppose the Council just figured we would all be bright enough to write one up.

What led me to this revelation you ask?

When I was going through my QSA Requalification this spring, they had a scenario with a jump box solution.  One of the questions related to the scenario involved how you would create a CCW for the insecure protocols used in the administrative VLAN that the jump box provided access.  While I answered the questions correctly, it triggered a new question regarding why a CCW was needed in the first place.

Then when the question was posed back to the Council, we got a reply indicating that a CCW would be required because of requirement 2.3.b which states:

“Review services and parameter files on systems to determine that Telnet and other insecure remote-login commands are not available for non-console access.”

The problem with the requirement is that it treats all Telnet with equal distain regardless of risk.  Yes, Telnet is always a clear text protocol, but when it is buried two or three layers away from any general network or the internet and requires administrator credentials and MFA, it is hardly as “at risk” as it would be when PCI started over 15 years ago and networks were as flat as a piece of paper.

As a result, I would like to recommend that the Council work to change 2.3.b to take into account the use of network segmentation, firewalls, VLANs, ACLs, MFA and jump boxes to allow the use of Telnet and insecure protocols when in a properly isolated and secure environment.  It seems silly to me that someone goes through all of the right steps to secure their environment only to be told that they still need a compensating controls to meet a requirement that does not reflect the real risk.

The other reason I feel this needs to be addressed is that a lot of banks and processors seem to see CCWs as a huge red flag.  Something to be avoided at all costs because it implies to them non-compliance.  And non-compliance is a “bad” thing.  I cannot tell you the collective hand wringing some banks go through for really simple CCWs all because they do not want to have any PCI assessments with CCWs.

Ultimately I think this all comes down to the fact that those banks and processors have no clue as to the amount of risk any CCW presents.  This is because most banks and processors staff their PCI compliance areas with auditors and compliance professionals, not technicians.  Given that the PCI DSS is predominately all about security technology and its implementation, these auditors and compliance people are not equipped to make the decisions that typically need to be made regarding CCWs.  As a result, they are all high risk in their eyes and treated accordingly.

Hopefully the Council can address this situation and we can avoid needless documentation for a preferred “best practice”.

24
May
17

What Is The Secret?

If you are a P2PE-QSA, you have likely seen the documentation required to do a Non-Listed Encryption Solution Assessment (NESA).  While the P2PE assessment work program (on which the NESA is based) is available to everyone, apparently the Council feels that only P2PE-QSAs have a right to see the new NESA documentation.

Why?

My assumption about this secrecy is that the Council is restricting access to the NESA documentation to stop any QSAs that are not P2PE-QSAs from conducting their own NESAs.

But what does that do to the rest of us that are not so fortunate?  How will the rest of the QSA/ISA community know that what they are receiving as the NESA is in fact what they should be receiving if they have never seen it and the Council has chosen to not do training?

People already complain that the Council makes statements at the Community Meetings that are never communicated to the wider PCI community that are unable to attend.  So here we are with a process that produces one or more documents (who knows unless you are a P2PE-QSA).  Yet, as a QSA/ISA, we have no idea what it looks like and have no guidance as to what we should look for in these documents to ensure that the NESA was done properly.  We could end up with anything with a PCI SSC logo on it labeled “NESA” and have no idea whether it is acceptable or not.

And if history is a guide, I guarantee you the Council will hold QSAs/ISAs responsible if they accept anything as a NESA even though they have provided no guidance.  That is what happened with the first AQM reviews.  None of the QSACs in that first round of AQM reviews had ever seen the standards by which they would be judged (they were still being developed).  But almost every QSAC went into remediation (there were a few “favorites” that dodged remediation) because they were all assessed to those standards even though the first time those standards were seen by those QSACs was at the start of their respective AQM assessment.

As QSAs/ISAs we have a right to not accept any documentation or attestations that we feel does not convey the information that we believe is necessary to prove compliance of a third party solution.  So I guess until the Council trains us in the new NESA process and what is acceptable and not acceptable, we do not have to accept any output from that process.

At least that is how I recommend QSAs/ISAs should treat the NESA documents until the Council decides to train us.

22
May
17

Answering Some Dream Team Questions

After our PCI Dream Team event on May 17, I thought I would take some questions that do not require long and involved answers and publish them in this post.  FYI – I have edited and spell checked these, so they likely do not look like you entered them but they should convey your questions as you asked them.  Hopefully I answered on of your questions.

Q: Does anything special need to be done with the use of Virtual Terminals?  We use the virtual terminals to manually enter credit cards from time to time.  The computers used are normal user computers with the basic security done, but I have been wondering if they need to have extra limitations or security put in?

A: There are a lot of solutions that imply they take the workstation/terminal out of scope or magically reduce scope when using virtual desktop (VDI) solutions.  None of it is true.  If a device is used to enter PAN (regardless of HOW), it is a Category 1 device because it is used to enter PAN.  The bottom line is that any device used to enter PAN is in-scope for full PCI compliance.  There is no “magic” to change that fact.

Q: Do all POI devices have a keypad? I’m thinking of PC’s with integrated MCR’s – will those all change to separate POI’s with a keypad?

A: All point of interaction (POI), aka card terminals, that are customer facing have a keypad because they need to be able to accept PIN entry.  Merchants that are going to P2PE/E2EE solutions end up with a separate POI that is connected to the POS PC/terminal via USB so that the POS solution can communicate the total price of the sale as well as to know if the transaction is approved or declined.  The POI securely communicates with the transaction processor over Ethernet or using the USB connection and the Ethernet connection of the POS PC.  In both cases, the POS PC never has access to the sensitive authentication data (SAD)/cardholder data (CHD) as it is encrypted at the POI.  However is using an E2EE solution, the QSA will need to validate that the E2EE solution to ensure that they do in fact encrypt at the POI and therefore the POS PC/terminal is out of scope.  In addition, the merchant will have to contact their acquiring bank to get formal approval that the E2EE solution gives scope reduction for the merchant.  This will likely require the QSA to provide their evidence and assessment procedures to the acquiring bank for that approval.

Q: Are administrator workstations always in scope for PCI DSS regardless if an administrator is connecting to CDE servers via jump box?

A: Yes, because they are “connected to” systems when they access the jump box.  They may not be entering cardholder data (CHD), but they likely can access it or influence its processing/transmission because they are administrators.  That said, I would treat them in the Open PCI Scoping Toolkit vernacular as a Category 2x system.  That means they can probably avoid the bulk of PCI requirements but, at a minimum, need to be properly security hardened, kept updated, have anti-virus/anti-malware and are monitored “periodically”.  And as a reminder, administrators will need to use multi-factor authentication (MFA) after January 31, 2018 when accessing the cardholder data environment (CDE).

Q: Are you having/forcing your clients to follow the December scoping guidance, and are you bringing administrator workstations into scope?

A: I guess I am curious as to when anyone would have thought that administrator workstations ever were out of scope?  Nothing has changed in that regard as they were always in scope for PCI compliance.

Q: Are “crash kits” in restaurants for use when the system is down in scope for compliance?

A: The kits themselves are not in scope, but when they get used, the forms that get generated which contain the embossed image or handwritten PAN and other sensitive authentication data (SAD)/cardholder data (CHD) place those forms in scope for PCI compliance.  They therefore need to be securely stored, securely transmitted and subsequently securely destroyed in accordance to the relevant requirements in section 9.

Q: Does pushing non-cardholder data out of CDE system excludes connected system out of PCI scope? For example pushing non-cardholder data such as CPU usage for monitoring or number of transactions per day used for reporting etc.

A: According to a discussion at the 2016 Community Meeting and a subsequent Assessor call, the Council has publicly stated that if it can be unequivocally proven that the flow is only outbound from the cardholder data environment (CDE) to a device and that the data does not contain cardholder data (CHD), that device can be ruled out of scope.  However you have to get your QSA to buy into that argument and I do not know too many QSAs that will agree with that decision.  In my experience, there is still too much of a risk that cardholder data (CHD) could leak through that flow and saying it is out of scope is not accurate nor is it good practice as it leads to an exfiltration point that is not monitored.  The question you have to ask yourself is, how will it look in that newspaper headline when your organization is breached that you ruled it out of scope because it was outbound only?

Q: PCI DSS requires a firewall in place, are host level firewalls meeting that requirement?

A: Yes, as long as they perform stateful packet inspection (SPI), they are properly and securely configured and they are appropriately monitored like any other in scope firewall.

Q: Regarding vulnerability assessments for internal scans, do we have to address medium vulnerabilities or only critical and high vulnerabilities?

A: The PCI DSS and the Council have been very clear on this which is why it is disconcerting when this question constantly gets asked.  The guidance for requirement 6.2 is very clear as it states, “Consider prioritizing patch installations such that security patches for critical or at-risk systems are installed within 30 days, and other lower-risk patches are installed within 2-3 months.”  The bottom line is that you need to apply ALL patches/updates to all in scope systems as soon as possible.  So get on with patching and updates, no excuses.

Q: More than once I’ve been told that the decision to implement PCI compliant controls is a financial decision. What are the expected fines and penalties for failing?

A: No organization gets to ignore any PCI requirement because of financial or any other reasons.  However in those cases where a requirement cannot be directly met, an organization must then come up with compensating controls that go above and beyond that requirement in order to be in compliance.  In my experience, it is almost always cheaper to meet the PCI requirement than to go the compensating control worksheet approach.  You will have to talk to the card brands as they are the ones that come up with the fines and penalties.

Q: Do you ever foresee the card brands implementing any sort safe harbor clauses in regard to PCI?  If a merchant is doing their best to be secure and (more importantly, as far as PCI is concerned) compliant and they are breached, as it stands right now, PCI will not help you.  Instead, PCI seems to be wielded as a weapon to extract fines from the merchant.

A: You are joking right?  LOL!  Actually, with merchants going to P2PE/E2EE and tokenization solutions, I could envision changes in the PCI compliance process at the merchant level because the risk is only with the POI.  Time will tell.

Q: Have you heard anything further regarding the FTC’s review of PCI?

A: Not a word and I would not expect to hear anything until the FTC decides to tell us anything.  I do know that issues regarding the FTC’s information requests from the QSACs were supposedly worked out and that the requested information was delivered to the FTC.  But that is the extent of my knowledge on the matter.

11
Feb
17

The Council Gets A Clue

Late this week the PCI Security Standards Council issued a new information supplement titled ‘Multi-Factor Authentication’ after the brew-ha-ha that occurred last fall at the Community Meeting in Las Vegas.  For once, the Council has issued an excellent reference regarding the issues of multi-factor authentication (MFA).  Although I still have a couple of minor bones to pick about this document, but more on that later.

If you understand the concepts of MFA, you can skip through the document to the end where the Council presents four scenarios on good and bad MFA.  These are well documented and explain the thought process behind why the scenario works or does not work for MFA.  The key takeaway of all of this is the independence of the MFA solution from the logon process.  The Council is getting in front of the curve here and stopping people from creating insecure situations where they believe they are using MFA that minimizes or stops breaches through administrators or users with access to bulk card data.

Now for a few things that I do not necessarily agree with in this document.

The first involves the Council’s continued belief that hardware security modules (HSM) are actually only hardware.  On page four, the following statement is made.

“Hardware cryptographic modules are preferred over software due to their immutability, smaller attack surfaces, and more reliable behavior; as such, they can provide a higher degree of assurance that they can be relied upon to perform their trusted function or functions.”

The Council has made similar statements over the years in the mistaken assumption that HSMs are only hardware.  HSMs are hardware that use software to manage keys.  There are standards that are followed (e.g., FIPS 140) to ensure that the HSM remains secure, but these devices are predominately software driven.  That is not to say that just any device can serve as an HSM, but a lot of us in the security community are concerned that the Council continues to perpetuate a myth that HSMs are only hardware which is patently false.

My other issue comes on page six as part of the discussion regarding the use of SMS for MFA.

“PCI DSS relies on industry standards—such as NIST, ISO, and ANSI—that cover all industries, not just the payments industry. While NIST currently permits the use of SMS, they have advised that out-of-band authentication using SMS or voice has been deprecated and may be removed from future releases of their publication.”

While everything in this statement is accurate, it gives the uninitiated the impression that SMS or voice is no longer a valid MFA solution.  I know this to be true because I have fielded some questions from clients and prospects on this subject, particularly about SMS.  The key is that this is not SSL and early TLS where NIST called them out as insecure and to no longer be used.  This is a “heads up” from NIST to everyone that there is an issue that makes SMS and voice not secure enough for MFA.

But while there is a risk, a lot of us in the security community question the viability of that risk when matched against merchant risk versus a bank or a government agency.  While I would not want any bank or government agency to use SMS or voice for MFA, a small business may not have a choice given their solution.  The reason is that the risk of an attack on SMS or voice is such that only a high-value target such as a bank or government agency would be worth such an effort.  In my very humble opinion, while a total ban is the easy solution, this is an instance where the Council should take a more nuanced approach toward the use of SMS and voice for MFA.  The bottom line to me is that small merchants using any MFA solution, even if flawed, is better than using no MFA solution.

I would recommend the following approach to manage this risk.

  • Level 4 merchants can be allowed to use SMS or voice for MFA.
  • Level 1, 2 and 3 merchants would be allowed to transition away from SMS and voice to a more secure MFA solution within one year of NIST stating that they are no longer acceptable.
  • All service providers would not be allowed to use SMS or voice for MFA once NIST states that both are no longer acceptable. This means service providers should start transitioning now if they use either.

Those are my thoughts on the subject.  I look forward to the comments I am sure to receive.

20
Dec
16

An Update On Multi-Factor Authentication

In the November 2016 Assessor Newsletter there is an update to the Council’s statements at the 2016 Community Meeting’s QSA Forum discussion regarding multi-factor authentication (MFA).

“We had a moment of excitement at the North America Community Meeting in September when we responded to a question in the Assessor Session about MFA. As several of us from the Council pointed out, some techniques historically in use are falling out of favor as acceptable approaches to MFA because, as they are becoming used, they fail to meet the basic requirements of MFA. A recent NIST announcement associated with a proposed revision to NIST Special Publication 800-63 series raised the potential of a sunset date for use of SMS as an out-of-band mechanism for a factor in MFA. Based on the questions asked, we felt a refresher on MFA would be of value.

Assessors should understand that multifactor authentication requires two or more independent factors used in such a way that the presenter of the factors gains no knowledge of whether any factor is valid until all factors have been presented. For example, if the first factor is submitted and results in an indication to the user that it is valid before the second factor is requested, then what you actually have is two, single-factor authentications. The critical issue is not when the validation is actually done; rather it is when feedback to the user is provided. If the user can’t tell which factor failed to grant access, then you have MFA. This common practice is illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 illustrates the better practice.

mfa-diagram

Figure 1 is sometimes referred to as a multistep authentication. Figure 2 unifies authentication into a single step. By doing the validation of both factors before providing an indication of authorization success or failure, no information is leaked about either factor.

MFA also requires that the factors be different in type. That is, at least two of the usual three types given below are required:

  • Something you know (e.g., password, PIN, security question challenge)
  • Something you possess (e.g., ICC card, physical token, cryptographic token or private key)
  • Something you are (e.g., physical biometric or behavioral biometric)

The factors must also be independent. Access to one should not grant access to the other. For example, if I use my mobile phone as my device for logging into a system and the system can validate my device with a high-degree of assurance, then it might be the something I possess. However, if it is also where I store my password (or the device to which a one-time-password (OTP) or password reset would be sent), then possession of the device may grant access to both factors. NIST acknowledges this as a risk in its DRAFT NIST Special Publication 800-63B Digital Authentication Guideline: Authentication and Lifecycle Management (5.1.3. Out-of-Band Devices).

Other circumstances may also result in loss of independence, for example, relying on a digital certificate as one factor if it is on the same device into which you are entering your password. If compromise of the device equates to having both the digital certificate and your password, then independence is lost. A similar issue exists when one factor gives access to more than one of the factors used in MFA. This is common with mobile devices that use a single factor to unlock (whether it be a passcode or a biometric) that then gains you access to other authenticators, e.g., stored passwords, the device’s identity, private keys, or software tokens. The assessor should carefully examine any method alleged to be multifactor to verify that it meets all of the requirements. For more information on this subject, consider the following publications:

  • DRAFT NIST Special Publication 800-63-3 Digital Authentication Guideline
  • DRAFT NIST Special Publication 800-63B Digital Authentication Guideline: Authentication and Lifecycle Management
  • DRAFT NIST Special Publication 800-63C Digital Authentication Guideline: Federation and Assertions
  • ISO 19092:2008 Financial Services Biometrics Security Framework
  • ISO/IEC 27040:2015 Information technology — Security techniques — Storage security

[1] Per our current PCI DSS FAQ, multistep authentication may also qualify as multifactor, as long as at least two types of factors are used and the first step is not sufficient to gain knowledge of (or constructive use of) the second authentication factor. Note that an updated version of this FAQ will be published shortly.”

So let us discuss what we probably agree with the Council on in their statements above because that is the easier discussion.

I think most security professionals would agree with the discussion that the factors must be independent of the device being used to log onto the systems.  As a result, if you have the RSA SecurID Software Token or Symantec VIP apps on a cell phone or tablet, that device should also not be able to log onto the systems you are trying to protect.  The same holds true with the practice of putting a certificate on a device for MFA.  The rationale being that if an attacker has the device and the device owner’s credentials, MFA is doing nothing because the second factor will either already be on the device or will be displayed there.

However, the “moment of excitement” occurred because that was not the discussion that occurred at the QSA session.  What was stated at that session was that ALL out-of-band MFA to anything other than a traditional fob was no longer allowed.  I know that was what I heard and I was not the only one that interpreted the statements made that way.  So it was not like I was the only one that heard something wrong as there were a lot of people in that ballroom that heard the exact same thing.  That is what we all heard and why there was a “moment of excitement”.  And rightly so, as that would have put about 90% of MFA solutions as totally non-compliant.

There has been a lot of back channel discussion between QSAs regarding the Community Meeting MFA discussion.  One of the first discussions was about the risk involved.  While we mostly agree with the Council’s position on the independence issue, we have concerns about full adoption of all of NIST’s recommendations regarding MFA.  The Council has acted like SMS and Voice MFA was killed by NIST but that is not the case.  What NIST is saying is:

“Note: Out-of-band authentication using the PSTN (SMS or voice) is deprecated, and is being considered for removal in future editions of this guideline.”

Deprecated means that it is not recommended, but is still allowed.  Why?

Because there is a risk of SMS being intercepted, but to do that is not necessarily an easy task as say a man-in-the-middle attack of Wi-Fi.  During the back channel discussions, it was questioned whether or not the Council truly realizes the real world risk of intercepting SMS and how that plays against a government entity or a bank versus your run of the mill organization.  It is not a risk that has a “one size fits all” rating because of the complexity of the task.  And that is what has the security community up in arms about is that NIST’s recommendation is probably a good thing for the government or a bank to follow, but might still be acceptable for small business versus no MFA or even worse, lying to their bank that they have MFA.

Keep in mind that this is interception, so the target will not receive the message, only the attacker will receive it.  If you want to pass something else along, that further adds to the complexity.  In order to intercept SMS, one has to accomplish one of the following.

  • Infect the target’s smartphone with a virus.
  • Reissue the target’s SIM.
  • Hack the PSTN.
  • Intercept the target’s cell service via a Stingray type of device.

It is relatively easy to infect smartphones on a large scale.  However it is very hard to infect a particular smartphone or group of smartphones without the attacker physically getting their hands on the phone(s).  Given the prevalence of using fingerprints and patterns to log onto phones, even physically having the phone makes infecting it not a quick task and requires equipment to break in and infect the device.  Doing that without the target(s) being suspicious is probably very low.

Reissuing a target’s SIM is relatively easy but creates a huge timing issue.  Because it works only once, that means the attacker must reissue the SIM right at the time the target is receiving the SMS MFA or they will miss the code.  The risk of that timing happening is very, very low even for employees of government entities.

So this leaves us with hacking the PSTN and using a Stingray device.  Hacking the PSTN is also supposedly relatively easy.  Here are the steps required to intercept SMS.

  • The attacker must create their own fake call processing capability (MSC).
  • The attacker must then get the real MSC to release the target’s phone to the fake MSC.
  • The attacker must then point his fake MSC to their own device for the SMS MFA message.
  • The attacker must then wait for the target to logon to generate an SMS MFA request.
  • The attacker must then use the SMS MFA before the target generates a new SMS MFA because they did not receive the original SMS MFA.

The first problem is creating a fake MSC.  This is not as easy as you might think for your run of the mill attacker.  Governments have them, criminal organizations have them, but your average hacker going after credit cards is not going to have such capability unless they are extremely serious about their craft as there are much easier ways to go after cardholder data (CHD).

But assuming we have someone that is truly determined and has such a capability, they must then intercept the SMS MFA message and use it before the target gets wise that their SMS is being intercepted.  This means the attacker has to hope that their target is not a heavy user of SMS.  Portio Research estimates that there are around 16 million SMS messages sent every minute in the world.  Given there are approximately 6.8 billion phones in the world, that means that your target will, on average, receive just over three messages in a day via SMS.  One of those likely to be the MFA message you are trying to intercept probably the first message of the day.  So predictability is on the side of the attacker.

That said, most users of SMS MFA are going to likely only try twice to get their SMS MFA message before they call the help desk to find out what the problem is with the MFA solution.  It will likely be at that point that any attacker will likely be found out because the help desk will discover that the user complaining is already logged onto the systems.  So just because the attacker has access does not necessarily mean they are home free and can do as they please.

As a result, hacking SMS through the PSTN, while possible, is probably only a risk at a very high value target will likely have to face.

So in this discussion of SMS MFA risk, what we have left is using a Stingray device to intercept the target’s mobile service.  This will be like drinking water through a firehose because you will not only have to grab your target’s service, but everyone else that is nearby your Stingray device.  Which brings up the next issue which is that your Stingray device will have to stay in near proximity to your target in order to grab the information you desire.  If you target is truly mobile, that could be very problematic unless you have the resources to install Stingray devices like the FBI or CIA on every cell tower in town.  Again, I would say the likelihood of such an attack is relatively low for all but the most determined attackers which will stop at nothing to get into an organization.

At the end of this mental exercise, we again question the Council adopting NIST’s recommendation regarding SMS MFA without considering the actual real world risk.  Just because a threat exists, does mean the risk is automatically high because NIST is getting ready to deprecate it.  Again, NIST is securing the government and is sharing the results of their research with the rest of us because we, as taxpayers, have paid for it and deserve the results of their research.  That said, that does not mean that everything they produce is always relevant to every organization outside of the government.  Most of it is, but not everything.  This SMS MFA deprecation is probably relevant at some point, but for the current timeframe, SMS MFA is better than no MFA.

But that brings us to the fact that NIST did not say that SMS MFA cannot be used as they did with SSL and Early TLS.  All NIST did say was that they do not recommend it and that sometime in the future they may not allow it.  As a result, if an organization is using SMS MFA, it is still allowed to be used.  NIST has only put organizations on notice that at some point, SMS MFA will no longer be allowed.

But by their statements, the Council has taken NIST’s future deprecation comment to mean that SMS MFA is dead now and that is false.  Yes, organizations should probably look at any SMS MFA solution skeptically from here on out, but SMS MFA is still allowed by NIST just not recommended because of the risk.  That said and as has been discussed, we question if the risk presented is realistic for all organizations given the effort required.

So let us bring this back to the real world.  The vast majority of large retailers have or are in the process of implementing P2PE/E2EE solutions with tokenization.  Those implementations that are in process will likely be done by the end of 2017.  Those remaining 98% of the rest of retailers will likely never ever encounter it because of the effort required to tap SMS just does not justify the reward.

There is a tremendous MFA infrastructure installation and the Council by their statements threatened the vast majority of that install base with their statements that did not match what NIST was stating.  That is what we are arguing over and what drew the “moment of excitement” at the Community Meeting.

In the end, while it is good to know that NIST believes SMS MFA to be a bad solution going forward, exactly what is the Council protecting with their statements?  With CHD no longer stored by large retailers, the risk is at the small retailers, transaction gateways, transaction processors and banks.  So the Council’s and NIST’s recommendations should be focused at those entities that actually pose a risk and not painted with a broad brush against all organizations.

The Council has chastised us all over the years for not focusing on the risk presented in our assessments.  It is time for the Council to take some of that same medicine and recognize that not every NIST pronouncement needs to be tossed out to the PCI community as though it is gold.  The Council also needs to recognize the risk presented and act accordingly.  It is no longer 2008 and organizations are not protecting SAD/CHD.

A lot has changed in the decade since the Council was founded.

15
Dec
16

The Council Speaks On A Number Of Topics

The Council had a Webinar session for QSAs and ISAs on Thursday, December 15. It was a great session, but at only an hour, there were a lot of questions that went unanswered.  The following were the more notable discussion topics.

Not Tested

The Council got the message and they are working on new wording for the AOCs as well as some guidance for “Not Tested” and how it can be used and not impact PCI compliance.  They expect to have something issued in the first quarter of 2017.

Network Segmentation and Scoping

This was a very hot topic and drew a lot of questions and some useful answers as well as generating a slew of new questions.

We got a definition of “purpose-built controls”.  There really is not any change here in what the Council has told QSAs and ISAs in the past regarding segmentation.  The bottom line is that “purpose-built controls” are those controls that segment one network from another network.  That can be firewall rules, access control lists (ACL) or any other controls that control or limit the communications from one network to another network.  I posed a question regarding encryption such as TLS and IPSec as still being a valid segmentation control, but it did not get answered.  I am assuming that it still is a valid control given the Council’s statement that nothing has changed, but until we have explicit confirmation, that still is an assumption, not a fact.

The Council answered a number of questions regarding whether or not in-scope devices can be on the same network segment as out of scope devices can co-exist.  As usual, we go the “it depends” discussion.  The bottom line is that it depends on the threat presented by the out of scope devices to those in-scope.  If an organization has lax security controls over all of their networks and devices, then I would be hesitant to allow out of scope devices to be on the same network segment as in-scope devices.

One of the most amazing discussions on this topic was an answer given regarding whether or not a device that has only an outbound connection from the cardholder data environment (CDE) can be considered out of scope.  Under the Open PCI Scoping Toolkit, this would be categorized as a 2C system.  The Council started out with their stock answer of “it depends” and then clarified that answer.  The answer given was that while the system would be in scope because it is connected to the CDE, what requirements it would need to comply with would depend on the risk presented by the system to the CDE.  This seemed to give organizations an opportunity to argue a minimization of requirements.  I am sure this will result in a lot of arguments between QSAs, ISAs and their assessees in the future.

As a funny aside, the Council mentioned the “three hop rule” and then feigned ignorance as to where it came from.  As I pointed out in my post, it was from the 2014 Community Meeting in Orlando.

Not-Listed Encryption Solutions

This guidance is a train wreck and just seems to keep getting worse.  The Council gave a lot of answers to questions, but it just seemed like they were digging an ever deeper hole, not filling it in.

The biggest news is that the Non-Listed Encrypted Solution Assessment (NESA) document should be available for review in the first quarter of 2017.

The next biggest news was the Council reconfirming that this is only guidance/recommendations and not some new process that is mandatory.  They even made sure to tell everyone attending that QSAs are NOT to hold up an organization’s ROC/SAQ over not having a NESA for their E2EE solution.  So if an E2EE solution does not have a NESA, then the fallback based on a lack of guidance from the Council is to preform whatever procedures that the merchant’s acquiring bank recommends.

The purpose of this Information Supplement the Council stated was to provide QSAs, merchants, service providers and banks with the Council’s acceptable way to deal with assessing E2EE solutions.  While on its face this statement and rationale makes sense, it does not make sense from the standpoint that the organizations driving the E2EE solutions are the banks and processors that have partnered with the E2EE solution providers.  Given that the banks and processors are the same organizations driving PCI compliance of the merchants that consume those E2EE solutions it seems rather odd that they would be questioning what is acceptable for PCI compliance of their approved E2EE solutions.

At the end of the day, it just seems that this NESA process is a solution looking for a problem and that the only problem the process really solves is getting more E2EE solutions to just finish the NESA and validate as a P2PE solution.

Until the banks and processors get behind the NESA process, I see this effort as dead on arrival.

So it sounds like it will be a busy first quarter for the Council.

The Council stated that the slide deck for this session will be posted to the Portal sometime after the first of the year.




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